Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Promoting physically active children in car-dependent NZ

April 24, 2014

Kids in the city: Promoting physically active children in car-dependent NZ

New Zealand has one of the highest rates of car ownership in the world and cities that are purpose-built for car travel. One of the consequences of our car dependency has been declining rates of physical activity, despite compelling evidence of its health benefits.

Professor Karen Witten will be presenting a lecture entitled Kids in the city: Neighbourhood design to encourage physically active children on May 7 as part of the Albany professorial lecture series. She is Professor of Public Health of the Social and Health Outcomes Research and Evaluation (SHORE) research centre at Massey University.

“Auckland is becoming a more compact city and we wanted to make sure children’s wellbeing was taken into consideration. There are almost 300,000 children living in Auckland,” she says.

Kids in the City is a study of 10-12 year old children’s use and experiences of Auckland neighbourhoods and was funded by the Health Research Council.

In the study 250 children living in different neighbourhood environments, from inner city apartment blocks to suburban settings, kept trip dairies and wore GPS and accelerometers for seven days to reveal where they go, how they move about the city and how active they are in different settings.

“I would like to see residential streets being designed as safe places for children to play and get about independently on foot, bike and scooter”.

Children’s levels of physical activity have dropped markedly in New Zealand over the past 20 years along with their opportunities to play and explore their neighbourhoods unsupervised. Over the same time period obesity rates have risen; the long term health impacts of inactivity and obesity are considerable as both track from childhood to adolescence to adulthood and are risk factors for chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some cancers.

Professor Witten says designing cities that encourage children to to be more active have wider benefits. “Neighbourhoods that work for children will work for people of all age groups. We need to shift from designing cities for cars to designing cities for people”.

Professor Witten’s presentation will illustrate the diversity of Auckland children’s neighbourhood experiences in relation to their mobility, play spaces, recreational opportunities and street encounters and highlight ideas for creating more “child friendly” neighbourhoods.

Event details:
Date: Wednesday May 7
Time: 6.30-8.30pm
Venue: Sir Neil Waters Lecture Theatres, Albany campus, Massey University
RSVP: Public-Lectures@Massey.ac.nz; (09) 414 0800 extn: 43036

Please RSVP as seating is limited

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Hundertwasser Art Museum: Whangarei Says Yes

Provisional results confirm Whangarei voted Option B in a landslide result for the Hundertwasser and Wairau Maori Art Centre project. 13,726 voted for the Hundertwasser project in a FPP binding referendum that had higher voter turnout than the last local body election. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news