Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Auckland student uses thesis to honour her late mother

Auckland student uses thesis to honour her late mother

For University of Auckland student Marcia Leenen-Young, finishing her PhD was more than gaining a degree, it was also a way of honouring her mother.

During the completion of her PhD thesis her mother, Teresa Young, was diagnosed with cancer and passed away.

“I promised her that I would finish it.”

“I was still quite literally in the midst of grief. I had to finish it for her and for me and everyone who was around me at the time.”

Marcia completed a PhD thesis titled: “Polybius' Self-constructed Image in the Histories and its effect on his Historical Objectivity”. Polybius was an ancient Greek historian of the Hellenistic Period. The complex topic involved critiquing the accuracy of his historiography.

She graduated on Monday as part of the University’s Autumn Graduation.

Marcia was so moved by her mother’s support that in the weeks leading up to her completion she changed her name by deed poll to include her mother’s surname ‘Young’.

“I wanted my mum’s name on the thesis.” “It was a way of acknowledging her contribution to the thesis and an honouring of what she meant to me.”

“She encouraged me every day. She would be sick in bed just after chemo and I would be trying to feed her and she would say ‘don’t worry about me, haven’t you got work to do’?”

Now she can hardly believe she’s completed her thesis.

“I remember just sitting back and thinking ‘I’ve done it. We’ve done it’.”

“It’s a little bit unreal. I look at it and think ‘did I write that? Are those my words on the paper’?”

Marcia’s thesis also marks another significant milestone; she is the first woman of Samoan descent to complete a PhD in Classics and Ancient History.

As part of her completion of the thesis Marcia received a Leadership Grant Fund for Maori and Pacific students that enabled her to travel to the United Kingdom to carry out research at London’s University College, Oxford University and the University of Edinburgh.

“It opened my eyes quite a lot, particularly in Oxford. Everything is centred on education and the acquisition of knowledge.”

The Mt Eden resident now hopes to continue working in academia either in her field, or in student services at the University. She already works for the Faculty of Arts’ Tuākana programme, a University-wide mentoring and tutoring scheme for Māori and Pacific students. She also co-runs Tall Poppies, a project to assist Waitakere College’s Maori and Pacific pupils gain academic skills before entering university.

Marcia has written about her experiences by contributing the chapter Maintaining motivation: a postgraduate thesis when life gets in the way to the book The postgraduate student handbook: Surviving and succeeding in further study set to be published in mid-2014.

Marcia’s experiences in coping with grief and achieving under extreme pressure are already well proven, but she wants to continue to be strong. While recently supporting a team of walkers at the Oxfam Trailwalker 2014 - a gruelling 100km fundraising walk around Lake Taupo - she heard a woman on the side-lines shouting a statement of encouragement to the competitors that she now uses to boost her confidence: “Pain is temporary, pride is forever.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: The Typewriter Factory

I finished reading Don’t Dream It’s Over not long after it came out last August. I even started writing a review, which took something of an ‘I’m sorry people, but it’s already over’ approach. I’ve been pretty negative about journalism as it’s practiced in the mainstream (or MSM, or corporate media or liberal media or whatever terminology you prefer) for quite some time (see for example Stop the Press), and I believe the current capitalist media model is destructive and can’t be reformed. More>>

Sheep Update: Solo World Shearing Record Broken In Southland

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new World solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing after a tally of 605 in a wool shed north of Gore. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Dick Frizzell At The Solander Gallery

One of the most influential and celebrated contemporary Pop artists working in New Zealand, Dick Frizzell is mostly known for his appropriation of kitsch Kiwiana icons, which he often incorporates into cartoon-like paintings and lithographs. Not content with adhering to one particular style, he likes to adopt consciously unfashionable styles of painting, in a manner reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein. More>>

Old Music: Pop Icon Adam Ant Announces NZ Tour

Following his recent sold out North American and UK tours, Adam Ant is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the release of his landmark KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER album with a newly-remastered reissue (Sony Legacy) and Australasian tour. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Looking Back

Writing a memoir that appeals to a broad readership is a difficult undertaking. As an experienced communicator, Lloyd Geering keeps the reader’s interest alive through ten chapters (or portholes) giving views of different aspects of his life in 20th-century New Zealand. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Purple (and Violet) Prose

This is the second recent conjoint publication by Reeve and Stapp; all to do with esoteric, arcane and obscure vocabulary – sesquipedalian, anyone – and so much more besides. Before I write further, I must stress that the book is an equal partnership between words and images and that one cannot thrive without the other. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news