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Joyce's budget assault on regional polytechnics

Joyce's budget assault on regional polytechnics

Since Steven Joyce became tertiary education minister in 2010 the government has made severe funding cuts to regional polytechnics. His government has cut funding to ten regional polytechnics by an average of one dollar in every five according to Tertiary Education Commission data.

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Tune in for the latest season of Mad Women

A brand new season of Mad Women begins this month with Stu McCutch, CEO of the educational agency Auckland University struggling to stay a step ahead of the rapidly changing times. McCutch wants to cut his admin staff costs to impress his biggest client, Steven Joyce.

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Awanuiārangi members vote on 3.7 percent for two years

Staff at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi are voting on a new collective agreement that provides two pay rises over two years. The first pay rise of 1.5 percent will be backdated to the beginning of the year. The second pay rise of 2.2 percent takes effect from 1 January next year.

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Part-time demonstrator wins mystery trip

A part-time demonstrator from the University of Canterbury won TEU's Air New Zealand mystery break prize for new members who joined the union in March. Jasmine Liew is from Malaysia and is a part-time demonstrator in the College of Science at the University of Canterbury.

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Take my money, please

When should a university refuse an offer of funding and who should it discriminate against, asks University of Canterbury branch president Jack Heinemann.

Policy at the University of Canterbury highlights several sources from which it might refuse to accept grants or other kinds of support, such as "tobacco companies, arms manufacturers, and terrorist or criminal organisations."

But how do universities decide the moral and ethical acceptability of other sources of funding? Jack Heinemann examines the difficulties enforcing these moral judgements and also offers some solutions.

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TEU challenges government's Education Amendment Bill

Yesterday TEU joined hundreds of other organisations and individuals in speaking to parliament's Education and Science Select Committee, opposing the government's Education Amendment Bill.

The bill, which removes elected staff and student seats from university and wānanga councils, has drawn vocal opposition from across the tertiary education sector, and notably a large number of senior academics have spoken out at the select committee opposing it.

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Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

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