Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Children Tackle John Key Over Road Safety

Media Release 18th May 2014 No Embargo

From NZ School Speeds

Children Tackle John Key Over Road Safety

19th to 26th May is Road Safety Week and to draw attention to this Lucinda Rees from NZ School Speeds has interviewed children at her local primary school in Swannanoa, North Canterbury and has a personal plea from the children for the Prime Minister John Key.

Swannanoa School is on a 100km/h road. During start and finish times the speed limit has recently been reduced to 60 km/h and the rest of the time the speed limit reverts back to 100km/h —just metres from where children play cars travel at 100km/h during the school day.

Rees spent some time with the children to find out their views and was surprised at their knowledge. Those who walked or cycled seemed acutely aware of the road dangers that are posed to them on a daily basis. Apart from asking for lower speeds they want more police visibility, colours on the roads of school zones and speed bumps. And they wanted consistent speed reductions outside schools throughout the country.

There is plenty of rhetoric from the Ministry of Transport about school zone safety practices that are being put in place but these don't target the children who attend schools, instead they merely confuse drivers with inconsistent school zone speed limits. The World Health Organisation recommends a maximum school zone speed limit of 30km/h. Many European countries have adopted this and their road toll is reducing.

'Our road toll is going up, rather than reducing like the Netherlands and Sweden. Our vehicle fleet quality is improving so the road toll should be going down. It's time for the Ministry of Transport to learn from these countries and adopt road safety practices recommended by the World Health Organisation.

'To change the culture laws need to be forced upon them. In Sweden, in 2013, there was a 9% decrease in road fatalities over the previous year. Penalties for driving offenders are tough and enforcement measures are regular and consistent, as are speed limits.

'Start with the basics: introduce a law that has consistent school speed limits and also give cyclists better visibility with a law that states a safe passing distance. Children should be able to cycle safely to school, learn about road safety before they get behind the wheel themselves.' 'Our school zones should have speed limits of no more than 70km/h during the school day and when children are coming and going the speed limit should reduce to a maximum of 30km/h,’ says Rees.

'Rural children, like those in Swannanoa School, deserve the same safe conditions as urban ones,' says Rees, 'but as the rules stand even those who take the bus are endangered: You can't expect drivers to slow for school buses to the mandatory 20km/h speed limit, whether they have all the bells and whistles as well as flashing lights, if they are still allowed by law to speed in excess of the recommended 30km/h speed limit through school zones.

'Drivers will soon adopt the habit of slowing near children if they are made to do it.

Watch these inspirational children from Swannanoa School on the NZ School Speeds Facebook site https://www.facebook.com/NZSchoolSpeeds. 'These children are not just perceiving the dangers on their route to and from school - they are living them. Drivers need to be made to slow consistently in all school zones and the children need laws that protect them on route to school.' Since the Ministry of Transport do nothing, we need leadership from the top. As one 9 year old student says: 'The speed limit should be slowed down or something bad could possibly happen.'

https://www.facebook.com/NZSchoolSpeeds

On Monday 19th May Lucinda will also be representing the road safety charity Brake at Cathedral Grammar College, 62 Ferry Road, Christchurch from 8.30am until 9.30am and will be available for interviews for both Brake and NZ School Speeds.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review And Rap Beefs: Tame Impala, Currents.

Tame Impala’s new album Currents has one of the hallmarks of an enduring album. At first listen it seems like good, if somewhat ordinary, pop but as you go back more and more layers unravel revealing deeply rich, expertly crafted songs. More>>

Flagging Enthusiasm: Gareth Morgan Announces Winner Of $20k Flag Competition

The winner of the Morgan Foundation’s $20,000 flag competition is “Wā kāinga / Home”, designed by Auckland based Studio Alexander. Economist and philanthropist Gareth Morgan set up the competition because he had strong views on what the flag should represent but he couldn’t draw one himself. More>>

ALSO:

Books: The Lawson Quins Tell Their Incredible Story

They could have been any family of six children – except that five of them were born at once. It will come as a shock to many older New Zealanders to realise that Saturday July 25 is the Lawson quintuplets’ 50th birthday. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Wartime Women

Coinciding as it does with the movie Imitation Game which focusses on Alan Turing breaking the Enigma code in Hut 6 at Bletchley Park (“BP”), this book is likely to attract a wide readership. It deserves to do so, as it illustrates that BP was very much more than Turing and his colleagues. More>>

Maori Language Commission: Te Wiki O Te Reo Māori 2015

The theme for Māori Language Week 27 July – 2 August 2015 is ‘Whāngaihia te Reo ki ngā Mātua’ ‘Nurture the language in parents’. It aims to encourage and support every day Māori language use for parents and caregivers with children” says Acting Chief Executive Tuehu Harris.. More>>

ALSO:

Live Music: Earl Sweatshirt Plays To Sold Out Bodega

The hyped sell-out crowd had already packed themselves as close as they could get to the stage before Earl came on. The smell of weed, sweat and beer filled Bodega – more debauched sauna than bar by this point. When he arrived on stage the screaming ... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news