Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Shanghai to become a classroom for NZ teachers on study tour

Shanghai to become a giant classroom for NZ teachers on study tour

Ten secondary school teachers will experience many facets of Shanghai on a study trip designed to encourage more content about Asia in New Zealand classrooms.

The teachers will head to Shanghai this week (Sunday 25 May to Saturday 31 May) to participate in a week-long forum organised by the Asia New Zealand Foundation.

The aim of the trip is to provide secondary school teachers with first-hand experience of business, culture and customs in China, so they are inspired to include more Asia content in their teaching. They will hear from a range of different industries to give them a broad knowledge of China’s economy.

The Foundation has previously led visits of business studies teachers to Shanghai but has expanded this year’s tour to also include teachers from other subject areas, such as geography, media studies and history. “Shanghai ticks a lot of boxes for different subject areas”, says Asia New Zealand Foundation director of education Jeff Johnstone. “It has a fascinating history, rich culture and extensive economic ties to New Zealand.”

The teachers will be briefed by New Zealand government agencies and will meet with representatives of Disney Corporation, The Warehouse, Zespri, and consultancy firm Redfern Associates, which is headed by New Zealander Scott Brown.

They will also visit Shanghai’s urban planning museum, factories in the city of Changshu, English language newspaper Shanghai Daily, andThe Brew – a microbrewery set up by New Zealander Leon Mickelson.

The participating teachers are:
• Clinton Olsen – Rangiora High School, Canterbury
• Vaishally Gandhi – Scots College, Wellington
• Anna Wilson – Wellington East Girls’ College
• Helen Benson – Paraparaumu College, Kapiti
• Murray Armstrong – Tauranga Girls’ College
• Janine Maclarn – Cambridge High School, Waikato
• Trudy Gibb – Glendowie College, Auckland
• Kristy Burling – St Mary’s College, Auckland
• Grahame Cope – Rangitoto College, North Shore
• Tina Hallowes – Albany Junior High, North Shore

Mr Johnstone says that while recognition of China’s importance to New Zealand has grown in recent years, many teachers did not learn about the country during their own education. Fewer still have travelled to China.

“Teachers who have participated in our previous study tours to Shanghai have gone back to their schools with a new perspective on the importance of Asia to New Zealand.

“The trips have enabled teachers to develop new resources, incorporate case studies from China into their teaching, and organise study trips to Asia. Some teachers have been inspired to learn Chinese themselves, or have encouraged their schools to look at offering the language to their students.”

The Asia New Zealand Foundation is a non-profit, non-partisan organisation dedicated to building New Zealand’s links with Asia through a range of programmes, including business, culture, education, media, research and a Leadership Network. The Foundation is celebrating its 20th Anniversary this year.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Education
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news