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Finalists of Canterbury University $85k entré competition

Finalists named in University of Canterbury’s $85,000 entré competition

May 22, 2014

Ten finalists have been named in the annual $85,000 challenge competition run by the University of Canterbury student organisation entré.

Entré is a student club which runs events that see young hopefuls put their business ideas to the test with the help of mentors and business connections. The top 10 groups will take part in a series of workshops and mentoring sessions next semester in preparation for a final Dragon’s Den-style night later this year.

University student Brianne West is one of the finalists who is promoting her Sorbet cosmetics company with an environmental difference.

"Everything we manufacture is solid, biodegradable and most bars are wrapped in water soluble paper so that we generate a 100 percent waste free product. Our shampoo and conditioner bars are our most known product but we bring out new products constantly.

"Our bars are raved about and we have received placements in both print and digital media, both nationally and internationally," West says.

Other finalists and their concepts are University of Canterbury students Jorgen Ellis and Grady Nunn, kitset assembly services; Steven Seo, a specially designed wheelchair for disabled people; Ellie Barrett, genius children’s cooking classes; Tom Beaumont and Campbell Alexander, agricultural enhancement systems; Lucy Player-Bishop, chalked for academic assistance; Connor Eatwell and Hayden Graham, colours for different sounds; Ellen Palmer, 3D to help blind and visually impaired people; Charles He and Luke Gillespie, adventure programmes for international students; and Christchurch Polytechnic student Elizabeth Ball, hand painted shoes for shoe store.

ENDS

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