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Charter school experiment continues despite public view

Government continues costly Government continues costly charter school experiment despite public rejection


23 May 2013

For Immediate Release


A recent poll has found that two-thirds of New Zealanders are concerned at the amount of taxpayer money that is being diverted into charter schools.

Yet despite this, NZEI Te Riu Roa Immediate Past President Ian Leckie says the government is clearly committed to this expensive ideologically-driven experiment.

Yesterday the Ministry of Education released the names of 19 new applicants hoping to set up charter schools next year. The list includes a number who failed in their bid for funding last year.

Ian Leckie says time and again the government has been told that New Zealanders want to retain a quality public education system and do not want education funds diverted into propping up costly charter schools.

“Money to charter schools means less money in public schools. That’s not fair and it must have an effect on kids’ learning.”

He says a recent NZEI survey found that 63 percent ranked the diversion of taxpayer money to charter schools as either a “top concern in education” or were “somewhat concerned”.

The government has set aside more than $12m over two years to support charter schools – money that is not being used to support quality public education. Currently there are five charter schools operating with a total of just 367 children.

“This is an incredibly high per-head cost compared to the amount of funding the government pays for students in the public sector.

So far the five charter schools operating receive an operational payment per student of between $11,500 and $40,300 compared to an average of around $5,800 at lower decile public schools.

“Clearly the government is not letting up in its path towards privatising our education sector despite the overwhelming view of the education sector and the wishes of the New Zealand public.”
23 May 2013

For Immediate Release

A recent poll has found that two-thirds of New Zealanders are concerned at the amount of taxpayer money that is being diverted into charter schools.

Yet despite this, NZEI Te Riu Roa Immediate Past President Ian Leckie says the government is clearly committed to this expensive ideologically-driven experiment.

Yesterday the Ministry of Education released the names of 19 new applicants hoping to set up charter schools next year. The list includes a number who failed in their bid for funding last year.

Ian Leckie says time and again the government has been told that New Zealanders want to retain a quality public education system and do not want education funds diverted into propping up costly charter schools.

“Money to charter schools means less money in public schools. That’s not fair and it must have an effect on kids’ learning.”

He says a recent NZEI survey found that 63 percent ranked the diversion of taxpayer money to charter schools as either a “top concern in education” or were “somewhat concerned”.

The government has set aside more than $12m over two years to support charter schools – money that is not being used to support quality public education. Currently there are five charter schools operating with a total of just 367 children.

“This is an incredibly high per-head cost compared to the amount of funding the government pays for students in the public sector.

So far the five charter schools operating receive an operational payment per student of between $11,500 and $40,300 compared to an average of around $5,800 at lower decile public schools.

“Clearly the government is not letting up in its path towards privatising our education sector despite the overwhelming view of the education sector and the wishes of the New Zealand public.”

Ends

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