Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Christchurch School to Represent NZ in United States in June

Media Release 7 June 2014

Christchurch School to Represent NZ in United States in June

Four Year 8 students from Christchurch’s Selwyn House School will soon head state side for an International Future Problem Solving competition in Des Moines, Iowa. Sarah Bealing, Abby Croot, Suzanna Davis and Aisha O’Malley, will be presenting solutions around their competition topic of ‘Space’.

The Future Problem Solvers from Selwyn House completed three different problem booklets during 2013. Each booklet was evaluated and scored by specially trained evaluators. Teams within each of the three age divisions were invited to the national finals in Auckland in November based upon their scores during the year. The girls won Year 8 Division of Future Problem Solving at the National Finals.

The team now goes on to the International Conference, held this year at Iowa State University, to compete against the best teams in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and South Korea. Selwyn House students have placed at international championships on a consistent basis.

Coach, Linda Baran explains how the girls have been preparing for the challenge ahead. “As the topic is broad, we have prepared by breaking the topic down to key areas and working with a shared document on GoogleDrive so research can be added under the headings. The headings have included space exploration, space business and industries such as asteroid mining and space tourism, economics of space exploration, global collaboration and tensions, space colonisation and technologies resulting from space exploration. The girls have attended open evening University lectures, watched documentaries and read quality Science Fiction, which is often well-researched and provides futuristic ideas.

Aisha O’Malley, a team member comments, “Future Problem Solving has been influencing me since Year 5. It’s not just the teamwork skills or the problem solving, although they help. It’s the future thinking and research into so many different topics that has taught me so much about the world today. I probably wouldn’t have gained this knowledge until much later but thanks to FPS, I’ve had it since the day I started the programme at Selwyn House”.

Today’s students will live most of their adult lives in the 21st century. As our society changes more quickly now than at any previous time in history, we face the awesome burden of preparing today’s students for the uncertainties of the new millennium. We cannot hope to provide students with all the information they will need to survive in the future, but we can help them develop the thinking skills necessary to adapt to a changing world. Problem solving is an important curriculum matter that “needs to be addressed” as part of a curriculum designed to provide “a sound base for study.”

Each year Future Problem Solvers from Selwyn House participate in the New Zealand Future Problem Solving Programme. The girls are not only developing skills in creative problem solving and futures, but also in several other vital areas of education. The Christchurch students are learning group interrelationship skills as they work in a team to find solutions to future problems; they develop skills of organization and coherence through both written and oral communication; and they develop higher level thinking skills that will help them deal with problems of global magnitude as well as those on a more personal decision making level.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis: Never Too Old To Rock & Roll - Jethro Tull

As Greil Marcus recently observed in an NYRB review of Robbie Robertson's autobiographical Testimony, in rock and roll there is always an origin story. In the case of Jethro Tull founder Ian Anderson, he claims to have been influenced by his father's big band and jazz record collections and the emergence of rock music in the 1950s, but became disenchanted with the "show biz" style of early US stars like Elvis Presley... More>>

October: Alice Cooper Returns To NZ

It was March 1977 when Alice Cooper undertook his first ever concert tour of New Zealand – and broke attendance records. 40 years on and this revered entertainer continues to surprise and exude danger at every turn, thrilling audiences globally! More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: The Contemporary Relevance Of Denial

Denial has all the hallmarks of a riveting courtroom drama. Based on a 1996 British libel case that author David Irving brought against Lipstadt, the movie has been criticized as flat and stagey, but it nonetheless conveys a visceral clarity of vision and sense of overwhelming urgency. More>>

Obituary: John Clarke Dies Aged 68

Andrew Little: “I grew up with Fred Dagg and I am devastated by John Clarke’s death. He taught us to laugh at ourselves and more importantly laugh at our politicians.” More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis: Colin McCahon's 'on Going Out With The Tide'

Curated by Wystan Curnow and Robert Leonard, On Going Out with the Tide features major works that have been assembled from public and private collections across New Zealand and Australia. It focusses on McCahon’s evolving engagement with Māori subjects and themes, ranging from early treatments of koru imagery to later history paintings which refer to Māori prophets and investigate land-rights issues. More>>

Howard Davis: Rodger Fox Gets Out The Funk

By now a living New Zealand legend, band leader and trombonist Rodger Fox has performed with some of the biggest names in the jazz business, including Louie Bellson, Bill Reichenbach, Chuck Findley, Randy Crawford, Bobby Shew, Lanny Morgan, Bruce Paulson, Diane Schuur, Arturo Sandoval, David Clayton-Thomas, and Joe Williams, to name only a few. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news