Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Education Group Applauds New Te Reo Māori Publication

Education Group Applauds New Te Reo Māori Publication


Education and languages advocacy organisation COMET Auckland has applauded a new book entitled ‘The Value of the Māori Language: Te Hua o Te Reo Māori’ with Chief Executive Susan Warren saying such a publication is long overdue.

Warren says: “We are proud to congratulate Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga on the publication of this wonderful resource.

COMET Auckland is staunch in our position that Te Reo Māori revitalisation is an urgent priority for our nation. The need for languages to be actively provided for and promoted is more crucial than ever before, with a growing and diverse population and increasing levels of inequity. The Māori language is also a lifeline to success for Aotearoa, New Zealand because of the social, cultural and economic benefits that flow from a strong and vibrant Reo speaking society.”

Hauāuru Rawiri, COMET Auckland’s Project Manager Māori Education, adds: “If the language is to survive and flourish, it needs to be valued, and used across the wider community. We believe it should be an issue of citizenship to have access to - and be able to use - both English and Te Reo in our everyday lives.

Aotearoa, kōrerohia te Reo i ngā wā katoa, ki ngā wāhi katoa - New Zealanders, speak the language at all times, at all places."

Warren notes that for the Māori community, Te Reo is a crucial part of identity and culture, supporting tikanga and Māori world views:

“Te Reo uniquely expresses concepts and indigenous knowledge that cannot be expressed clearly in any other language, which means any loss of the language, could risk the loss of this precious knowledge. For these reasons, and so many more, we are right behind Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga in this valuable language and strategy resource.”

Warren continues: “Sadly, in the 12 years between the 2001 and 2013 censuses, the number of speakers of Te Reo Māori in NZ has reduced from 160,527 to 148,395, a loss of nearly 12,000 speakers.

“Less than 4% of the national population now speaks Te Reo well enough to hold a conversation, and in Auckland this proportion is even lower, with only 2.35% of the Tāmaki Makaurau population able to hold a conversation in Te Reo Māori.

“The dramatic drop in Te Reo speakers has happened despite the language revitalisation efforts of government and the community, showing that current strategies are not sufficient to maintain and revitalise the language.

“With the loss of earlier generations of fluent speakers, it is important that language support reaches all age groups, so there are young people coming through as fluent speakers, who can later support their own children’s learning; and also so older whānau and hapū leaders can develop enough fluency to confidently fulfil their role within their iwi.

“The one encouraging feature of the census data is the number of children who speak Te Reo Māori. In 2013, almost a quarter (24.6%) of those who could hold a conversation in Te Reo Māori were children.”

COMET Auckland is part of the Auckland Languages Strategy Group, which is calling for a regional languages strategy for Tamaki Makaurau, after central Government has repeatedly failed to prioritise New Zealand’s diversity of languages at a national level.

-Ends-

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Review: The Magic Flute - Magic Moments

Max Rashbrooke: Mozart’s The Magic Flute is an extraordinary tale, blending a story of great solemnity, of elegant music and Masonic virtue overcoming hatred and discord, with elements of extreme silliness and pure fantasy. .. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: ‘Lovely Swans Of Art’

On Cillia McQueen's 'In a Slant Light': Diary-keeping forms the basis of much of this memoir – as with earlier poems – and we are led gracefully through the waves of her life as she sails through both rough and smooth waters. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news