Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search


Education Group Applauds New Te Reo Māori Publication

Education Group Applauds New Te Reo Māori Publication

Education and languages advocacy organisation COMET Auckland has applauded a new book entitled ‘The Value of the Māori Language: Te Hua o Te Reo Māori’ with Chief Executive Susan Warren saying such a publication is long overdue.

Warren says: “We are proud to congratulate Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga on the publication of this wonderful resource.

COMET Auckland is staunch in our position that Te Reo Māori revitalisation is an urgent priority for our nation. The need for languages to be actively provided for and promoted is more crucial than ever before, with a growing and diverse population and increasing levels of inequity. The Māori language is also a lifeline to success for Aotearoa, New Zealand because of the social, cultural and economic benefits that flow from a strong and vibrant Reo speaking society.”

Hauāuru Rawiri, COMET Auckland’s Project Manager Māori Education, adds: “If the language is to survive and flourish, it needs to be valued, and used across the wider community. We believe it should be an issue of citizenship to have access to - and be able to use - both English and Te Reo in our everyday lives.

Aotearoa, kōrerohia te Reo i ngā wā katoa, ki ngā wāhi katoa - New Zealanders, speak the language at all times, at all places."

Warren notes that for the Māori community, Te Reo is a crucial part of identity and culture, supporting tikanga and Māori world views:

“Te Reo uniquely expresses concepts and indigenous knowledge that cannot be expressed clearly in any other language, which means any loss of the language, could risk the loss of this precious knowledge. For these reasons, and so many more, we are right behind Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga in this valuable language and strategy resource.”

Warren continues: “Sadly, in the 12 years between the 2001 and 2013 censuses, the number of speakers of Te Reo Māori in NZ has reduced from 160,527 to 148,395, a loss of nearly 12,000 speakers.

“Less than 4% of the national population now speaks Te Reo well enough to hold a conversation, and in Auckland this proportion is even lower, with only 2.35% of the Tāmaki Makaurau population able to hold a conversation in Te Reo Māori.

“The dramatic drop in Te Reo speakers has happened despite the language revitalisation efforts of government and the community, showing that current strategies are not sufficient to maintain and revitalise the language.

“With the loss of earlier generations of fluent speakers, it is important that language support reaches all age groups, so there are young people coming through as fluent speakers, who can later support their own children’s learning; and also so older whānau and hapū leaders can develop enough fluency to confidently fulfil their role within their iwi.

“The one encouraging feature of the census data is the number of children who speak Te Reo Māori. In 2013, almost a quarter (24.6%) of those who could hold a conversation in Te Reo Māori were children.”

COMET Auckland is part of the Auckland Languages Strategy Group, which is calling for a regional languages strategy for Tamaki Makaurau, after central Government has repeatedly failed to prioritise New Zealand’s diversity of languages at a national level.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


13/10: 40 Years Since The Māori Land March Arrived At Parliament

Traffic into Wellington came to a standstill as thousands of Māori and Pākehā streamed along the motorway into the capital on 13 October 1975, concluding the Māori land march to parliament. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news