Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Expert on future of genomic medicine visiting University

Expert on future of genomic medicine visiting University of Auckland

A leading researcher on human genome sequencing and its potential for large-scale population study of disease will speak at a University of Auckland seminar in the School of Biological Sciences.

A leading researcher on human genome sequencing and its potential for large-scale population study of disease will speak at a University of Auckland seminar in the School of Biological Sciences.

Head of the Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics at Australia’s Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Associate Professor Marcel Dinger and his team have made genome sequencing available on a broad scale using the Illumina HiSeq X Ten Sequencing System.

The system is capable of sequencing more than 300 whole human genomes per week.

Associate Professor Dinger says generating and analysing DNA sequences has the potential to address the clinical needs of thousands of people with genetic diseases and those diagnosed with cancer.

“The real power of Next Generation Sequencing is to revolutionise genetic diagnostic testing to substantially improve diagnostic yields in patients with diseases from single-gene defects,” he says.

Scientists believe genomic sequencing will revolutionise medicine and personal health management of disease. Potentially it will help millions of people reduce their risk of common diseases such as diabetes and stroke. It will also help identify novel gene regulators (all genes are regulated to control genetic information) that may prove to have valuable new application as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for disease and early human development.

Associate Professor Dinger gained his PhD from the University of Waikato and gained a New Zealand Foundation for Science and Technology Postdoctoral Fellowship to the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at the University of Queensland before moving to the Garvan Institute.

His current research focuses on understanding and dissecting the function of noncoding regions of the genome that are associated with human disease and development. He also leads research that uses sequencing approaches to characterise the molecular evolution of tumours.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Free Diving: William Trubridge Breaks World Record

With just a single breath, New Zealand free diver William Trubridge has successfully broken his own unassisted free dive world record of 101 metres. More>>

ALSO:

RLWC 2017 Draw: New Zealand Set For A Festival Of Rugby League

New Zealand Rugby League fans will have the chance to see the Kiwis in action against the best in the Pacific region for the Rugby League World Cup 2017, as announced today at the Official Tournament Draw. More>>

ALSO:

Non-Pokemon News: Magical Park A Safer Augmented Reality For Younger Audiences

Since May, Wellington City Council has been trialling a new app, Magical Park, in collaboration with the game’s New Zealand developer Geo AR Games, in parks around the city. Magical Park uses GPS technology to get users moving around the park to play within a set boundary. More>>

'Erroneous': Pokemon App Makers On Huge Privacy Flaw

We recently discovered that the Pokémon Go account creation process on iOS erroneously requests full access permission for the user's Google account... More>>

ALSO:

Te Wiki O Te Reo: Te Reo Māori Is For All New Zealanders — Minister

Minister for Māori Development Te Ururoa Flavell welcomes the start of Māori Language Week today and invites all New Zealanders to give speaking te reo Māori a go. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news