Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


University leads the way with cyber security

23 June, 2014

University leads the way with cyber security

One of the world’s leading cyber security academics says the University of Waikato is “leading the way” in helping fill an ever-growing shortage of cyber security professionals.

Fulbright specialist Professor Corey Schou is visiting the University of Waikato where he is working with Dr Ryan Ko at the country’s first cyber-security lab to advise on assessment and curriculum development for students being trained to enter the rapidly expanding industry.

Professor Schou is the programme director of the National Information Assurance Training and Education Center, established the first US Centre for Academic Excellence in information assurance at Idaho State University and has been a leader in setting computer security training standards in the US.

He says there is a worldwide shortage of information assurance professionals and an even greater shortage of people qualified to train them.

“We are losing ground relative to the demand for professionals and that is why this is so important,” he says of the CROW (Cyber Security Researchers of Waikato) lab, established last year.

“The foresight this University’s leadership has had to make this happen is brilliant.”

Professor Schou is one of the leading educators in the field of cyber security, or information assurance as it is termed in the US, and says part of his role at the University of Waikato is to help the programme – which includes New Zealand’s first Master of Cyber Security qualification – with assessment and curriculum development.

It’s important, he says, for academic institutions to work to a “common language” of measuring success. One means of ensuring this common language is through the use of internationally recognized professional certifications from organizations such as (ISC)2 and others.

As part of that, he has agreed to provide the Waikato students full cooperation with his lab in the US. There, he says, his students graduate with not only high academic skills but also a high standard of industry training.

Professor Schou has joined the industry-advisory board and Dr Ko says having someone of his expertise on hand has been invaluable.

Professor Schou also advocates for his students at Idaho State University to work in their communities and sets aside a month each year for them to visit schools, hold seminars and conduct workshops to address issues around cyber security.

He says that’s an important factor in ensuring ordinary people are aware of the risks.

“Taking this issue to the community is very important, it needs to happen.”

The University of Waikato will be doing that on 13 August, when Dr Ko takes part in a group discussion with NetSafe Chief Executive and digital safety advocate Martin Cocker and online legal expert and Faculty of Law Senior Lecturer Wayne Rumbles around cyber security as part of the University’s Winter Lecture Series.

Professor Schou will also be hosting a public lecture in lecture room S 1.02 at 6pm on 24 June 24.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news