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Halle’s ‘Cash-Clever’ Skills Mark Money Mentoring Milestone

Media Release: 23rd June 2014

Halle’s ‘Cash-Clever’ Skills Mark Getwise Money Mentoring Milestone

ASB wants to know what Kiwi kids really think about money as the country’s largest youth financial literacy programme, ASB GetWise, reaches the 400,000 student milestone in just under five years.

North Auckland school pupil Halle Tapatu aged 10 years old, is the 400,000th student to go through the primary and intermediate school programme since the launch in 2010, and is keen to inspire other kids around the country to share their creative money management tips as part of a new campaign to gather the best ideas from our nation’s youngest savers.

From mastering the basics of money management through to learning lifelong money-smart skills for everyday life, the free interactive ASB GetWise sessions have been gearing up the next generation to be money maestros.

Halle says she used to spend all her pocket or birthday money but has learned now to spend some and save some too thanks to her new-found ASB GetWise tips.

“I like to spend my money on clothes and skateboards but I have learned how to save for bigger things,” says Halle. “I’m saving up for a longboard and to go to university so I can become a police officer.”

Orewa North Primary school Principal Bruce Laws says there has been a significant change in perception of money by Kiwi kids over the years which had made the ASB GetWise programme even more vital for teaching pupils key life skills.

“Not long ago, kids thought money grew on trees because they saw the physical cash often but now it’s all in plastic, so it’s difficult for children to understand where money actually comes from.

“It’s hugely important to lay the foundations in the early stages of children’s lives and set them up for when they are older. This is especially relevant given most parents are so busy in this day and age and also because there isn’t anything like this in the school curriculum.”

“At ASB we are passionate about financial literacy and helping Kiwi kids to learn important money management skills while they are young,” says Roger Beaumont, ASB’s Executive General Manager of Marketing and Communications. “Since ASB GetWise began back in 2010, sessions have been held in over 55 percent of primary and intermediate schools nationwide.”

The ASB GetWise lessons are designed to complement the New Zealand school curriculum and teach practical money-smart skills that students can use in their everyday lives to make financial decisions at any age.

Primary and intermediate schools can sign up to the ASB GetWise financial literacy programme by visitinggetwise.co.nz, calling 0508 GetWise or by emailing support@getwise.co.nz

ENDS

About ASB GetWise

In November 2009, ASB announced the ASB GetWise financial literacy programme a longterm multimillion dollar commitment to help raise the financial literacy of New Zealand school children to a higher level.

ASB GetWise is an innovative financial literacy programme delivered free to primary and intermediate school students across New Zealand, teaching basic money management skills, including establishing good savings habits at an early age.

The programme aims to help New Zealand’s young people to make better financial decisions.

Independent, trained facilitators deliver interactive workshops that have been mapped against the New Zealand school curriculum and designed in collaboration with experts in primary education and cognitive development.

Teachers are also provided with resource packs to help them to provide ongoing financial literacy lessons in the classroom at their own pace.

Parents can also find money tips on how they can work with their children on money matters at home at asb.co.nz/GetWise.


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