Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Selective use of data in ERO report


Selective use of data in ERO report

Parents and schools should treat ERO’s use of data in its latest report on raising achievement in primary schools with caution because ideology is starting to trump evidence, NZEI Te Riu Roa says.

The Minister of Education claimed today that ERO’s report, “Raising Achievement in Primary Schools”shows that “improved use of data and innovative teaching practice are helping to lift student achievement.”

However the group of schools that reported the biggest shift in student progress between 2011 and 2012 was labelled by ERO as “less effective” because ERO says they did not focus enough on data or “deliberate actions to accelerate progress”.

NZEI Te Riu Roa President Judith Nowotarski said it appeared ERO and the Minister were guilty of selectively using data rather than looking at the range of reasons a school might be improving students’ progress.

The ERO report surveyed 193 schools. There was an over-representation of high decile schools in the sample. The 50% of schools that were labelled by ERO as “effective in responding innovatively to underachievement” had the highest percentage of students at or above National Standards in 2012, but they did not report as big a shift in student progress as the “less effective” group.

Judith Nowotarski said children’s learning was a complex process and looking at school success based solely on narrow National Standards data was clearly inadequate. However, she said the Government and its agencies needed to separate out ideology from evidence.

“To label a school ineffective because it has less of a focus on National Standards data than other schools is unfair and wrong if it is in fact successfully moving students’ progress forward. NZEI strongly believes in the use of evidence but we question ERO’s reliance on National Standards data and brief snapshots to make sometimes damning judgements about schools.”


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Review: Henry Rollins Burning Down The House

With his lantern jaw, close-cropped hair, and muscle-bound physique, Henry Rollins could not be further from the US Marine image his appearance might suggest. More>>

A Series Of Tubes: 150 Years Of The Cook Strait Cable

“It was a momentous achievement for its time. The successful connection came on the third attempt at laying the cable, and followed a near disaster when the first cable snapped - almost destroying the ship Weymouth in the process,” says Ms Adams. More>>

ALSO:

February 2017: Guns N' Roses - New Zealand Dates Announced

Founder Axl Rose and former members, Slash and Duff McKagan have regrouped for one of the century’s most anticipated tours... Rolling Stone said: "This was the real thing, the thing we'd all been waiting for: the triumphant return of one of the most important bands to cross rock music history. And it happened in our lifetime.” More>>

Werewolf: Brando, Peckinpah And Billy The Kid

Gordon Campbell: Initially, One-Eyed Jacks was supposed to have been directed by Stanley Kubrick from a script by Sam Peckinpah – yet it quickly became Brando’s baby... More>>

Book Awards: ANZAC Heroes Wins Margaret Mahy Book Of The Year

“Simply stunning, with gold-standard production values,” say the judges of the winner of this year’s Margaret Mahy Book of the Year Award in the prestigious New Zealand Book Awards for Children and Young Adults. ANZAC Heroes is also the winner of the Elsie Locke Award for the Best Book in the Non-Fiction category. More>>

Baby Animals: Hamilton Zoo Rhino Calf Named

Hamilton Zoo’s latest rhino calf has been named Samburu and he's being celebrated with a unique zoo experience... Samburu arrived after his mother Kito’s 16-month pregnancy and the calf brings the number of white rhinos at Hamilton Zoo to six. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news