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Robots and writers rule at MIT open day

Manukau Institute of Technology
23 June 2014

Robots and writers rule at MIT open day

‘Smart’ robot demonstrations, electricity storms, slam poetry and a reading by Man Booker Prize winning author, Eleanor Catton.

That’s just some of the fun on offer at this Saturday’s open day at the Manukau Institute of Technology’s new Manukau Campus. The purpose-built six-storey building sits directly above the new Manukau train station and offers hands-on learning in a ‘smart’ environment equipped with the latest technology.

“We’re proud to welcome our community to this world-class learning centre, right in the heart of Manukau City”, says Peter Quigg, Director of Operations for MIT. “Our students can’t wait to share their hard work and incredible innovations with the public.”

Each of MIT’s seven faculties will host an interactive zone, where visitors can try their hand at everything from computer games to knot tying and generating their own electricity storm. Visitors can watch a ‘smart’ robot in action, view a drag race car, and explore a model home built by high school students taking a class at MIT.

The Creative Arts Faculty will host jewellery-making demonstrations, as well as live readings from writers Anne Kennedy, Robert Sullivan and Catton. In the 250 seat Digital Theatre, performing arts students will dazzle the crowds with singing, dancing and slam poetry sessions.

Visitors can also take a guided tour of the impressive building, the result of a unique collaboration between MIT, Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, architects and artists. The stepped Maori poutama pattern incorporated into the architecture symbolises the attainment of higher levels of achievement and knowledge, while specially commissioned artworks tell the stories of the Manukau people and community.

“Our goal is for education to be accessible to all, so we think it’s fitting that our new campus is part of the Manukau interchange,” says Quigg. “We want everyone to feel welcome to hop off the train and look around the building, or come to a cultural event or show.”

MIT students will be on hand to demonstrate their work and answer questions about student life. Prospective students will also have the chance to chat with staff about enrolment and course options, or simply relax and enjoy the live music and food stalls.

Auckland Transport is offering free train travel from Britomart for the open day, delivering visitors straight to the Manukau train station underneath the campus.

The Manukau campus will officially open for students on the first day of semester two, Monday 21 July 2014, and will house the Faculty of Business & IT, and the School of Logistics.


MIT Manukau’s Open Day Festival
Saturday 28 June 2014, 10am – 5pm
Admission - Free
MIT Manukau& Manukau Train Station, Cnr Manukau Station Road & Davies Ave,

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