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New teen online career tool hits the bulls-eye

New teen online career tool hits the bulls-eye

One of the hardest issues teenagers face today is knowing what they want to do. An innovative new online tool, originally used by school career advisors, is available to help Kiwi parents and teenagers directly, identifying which career, degree, study path or job is right for them. Bulls-eye is an online tool that helps secondary school students identify their career options using quizzes and personality theory to match interests and strengths into a career direction.

Programme developer and HR professional Kate McBeath says, “Easy-to-use and 100% confidential, bulls-eye offers low-cost career planning to help with the challenge all teenagers face – working out what they want to do and how to get there. Bulls-eye is essentially a one-stop-shop that helps teens set off onto the right career path, detailing industries, job sectors and learning pathways suited to them based on international career and personality theory.”

“It’s not necessarily about finding the one job, but learning about your teenager’s personality, interests and strengths and what types of career paths they could follow. Working in the HR sector, I’ve seen so many people who don’t enjoy what they do because they are simply ill-suited or even uninterested in it. I want to empower teenagers into channelling their strengths and aptitudes into a career or industry they love and in which they will thrive.”

“As we head into the school holidays and the third term, it’s the perfect time for teenagers to sit down with their parents and discuss subject selection for next year. To get this right, you need to have an end goal. That’s where Bulls-eye comes in.”

The Bulls-eye experience starts with two quizzes. The first of these, focus on me, builds a profile of an individual’s interests, skills and personality. The second questionnaire, focus on my future, creates a picture of an individual’s vocational aptitudes and the kind of career they might be interested in.

The results of these quizzes, along with career matches, are then provided. Bulls-eye also provides subject selection suggestions, links to New Zealand study options and specialised information about roles in the New Zealand market and employment trends and statistics. Bulls-eye members can update their profile and goals over time, and has handy tips for parents on how they can support their teenager’s career exploration.

Established in 2012 with an initial focus on high schools and youth programmes, the tool is available to all kiwi parents and teenagers and can be purchased directly from the website by the public. Bulls-eye has over 1,400 individual users and is working in partnership with schools and youth leadership groups around the country.

A six-month membership for bulls-eye is only $29.00. For more information check out www.bulls-eye.co.nz. Click here for a short demo video.

ENDS

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