Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search


Statement From the Battison Family

[Follow text is based on an OCR scan. Please refer to the original document: SB36308431_14062713170.pdf]

Statement From the Battison Family

While we are pleased by the judgement of Justice Collins, we are still disappointed it had to go to the High Court. Our preferred option all along was mediation.

We do believe rules have a place. But they need to be reasonable and certain. Lucan has had the same style for three years at St John's. In 2014 when girls hair lengths at school aren't questioned, why should the rules be different for boys?

Despite what has been said in the media. Lucan never broke the rules. The rules, which we signed up for, were 'off the collar and out of the eyes". Lucan’s hair, whether in a hair tie or not, has conformed to this, but the new principal shifted the goal posts.

In this case, unfortunately, it is the school that did not follow the law.

We’d like, in particular, to thank Justice Collins for giving us a fair hearing. He heard the full extent of our case and as a result has made this judgement accordingly.

However, if we didn’t think St John’s was a good school, Lucan would have been quite happy to change schools. We admire and thank his teachers for their support.

If people never questioned certain issues, we would be a very backward society today.

We'd also like to thank all the people who have supported us — our family, friends, our lawyer, the school community of St John’s, and complete strangers. We have been overwhelmed by the number of phone calls and emails.

The criticism we have received as parents has been hurtful and unnecessary. We love our son and we've always taught him to stand up for what he believes in. This is different to not having a respect for rules. He wears his uniform with pride and that will not change.

All Lucan wants is to continue his education and get back to playing in the 1st XV.

We are still taking time to process this judgement. We don't wish to make further comment today. In the meantime, please contact our lawyer 101 Bates if you have any other queries.

Troy, Tania and Lucan Battison
27 June 2014

© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


13/10: 40 Years Since The Māori Land March Arrived At Parliament

Traffic into Wellington came to a standstill as thousands of Māori and Pākehā streamed along the motorway into the capital on 13 October 1975, concluding the Māori land march to parliament. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news