Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Victoria scientist honoured for communication

MEDIA RELEASE


30 June 2014

Victoria scientist honoured for communication

A track record of excellence in communicating science has won Victoria University of Wellington scientist Dr Simon Lamb a distinguished international award.

Dr Lamb, an associate professor in the School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences and one of the makers of Thin Ice, a documentary on climate change, is the recipient of the 2014 Athelstan Spilhaus award presented by the world’s largest earth science organisation, the American Geophysical Union.

The award is given annually to recognise individuals who have “devoted portions of their lives to expressing the excitement, significance and beauty of the Earth and space sciences to the general public”. The American Geophysical Union has 62,000 members spread over 144 countries.

Thin Ice – the Inside Story of Climate Science shows the range of human activity and scientific endeavour that continues to be applied to the effort to understand the world’s changing climate.

Dr Lamb was co-director and photographer, as well as narrator of the film. Thin Ice has screened at film festivals around the world and been downloaded tens of thousands of times.

Dr Lamb has also written several books and made television programmes and films which have reached large global audiences. His book, The Devil in the Mountain, which outlines his own research into how the Andes were formed, was named on the New York Times Book Review’s list of 100 Notable Books for 2004.

Dr Lamb says he is thrilled to receive the award from the international geophysical community.

“I have never really thought about awards because I have found it such fun over the years trying to communicate widely, through books, television and films, my own scientific research, together with the broader understanding of how our planet works.

“I have to confess, however, that I have sometimes been worried that it has used up a lot of my time, in a profession where one is judged mainly by one's own original scientific output.

“But being honoured like this by my scientific colleagues shows that there is now increasing recognition, in a world where science is playing such a huge role in both identifying and solving global problems, that all scientists must take the time to talk directly to the rest of the world about what they are doing."

To find out more about the Athelstan Spilhaus award, visit http://honors.agu.org/medals-awards/athelstan-spilhaus-award/

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Trading Places

Greg Clydesdale, a lecturer in business at Lincoln University, has written a comprehensive account of global trade from the seventh century to modern times. More>>

Sheep: Shearing Record Smashed In Hawke’s Bay

Three shearers gathered from around New Zealand have smashed a World record by 264 sheep despite the heat, the pumiced sheep of inland Hawke’s Bay and a year’s wool weighing an average of over 3.5kg a sheep. More>>

ALSO:

Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    ALSO:

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Education
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news