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Teaching Excellence winner for the University of Auckland

Another Tertiary Teaching Excellence winner for the University of Auckland


Sustained excellence in tertiary teaching has earned a national Tertiary Teaching Excellence Award for University of Auckland Senior Lecturer in Law, Khylee Quince.

Khylee received one of the 12 annual awards (worth $20,000 each) at a ceremony at Parliament to celebrate New Zealand’s finest tertiary teachers as recognised by their organisations, colleagues, learners and broader communities.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stuart McCutcheon comments: “I am sure that all of our colleagues at the University will join me in congratulating Khylee. Her success means that for 12 of the last 13 years, at least one University of Auckland academic has received a national award of this kind, an outstanding tribute both to the successful staff and to the quality of teaching at this University.”

Khylee’s citation describes her as a ‘real deal’ teacher – transformative, radical and supportive of learner empowerment and success.

“She is a successful and dedicated teacher who promotes accessibility of legal concepts, language and processes,” it reads. “Teaching is her strength and passion and integrating kaupapa Māori methodology is important to her and who she is. She has an innate ability to negotiate disparate worlds and engage, challenge and embrace all of her students. Khylee’s sense of humour and introductions for each class are legendary.”

Without exception, Khylee is hugely popular with her students. One says: “I feel lucky to have had the opportunity to learn from Khylee.” Another describes her as “an outstanding teacher who puts a lot of energy and commitment into supporting and advancing Māori student success.”

She is equally well regarded by her peers, one of whom describes her as “the real deal”.

Dean Andrew Stockley says the Law Faculty takes considerable pride in Khylee’s teaching achievements. “A signature of Khylee’s teaching is her use of humour and anecdote and the rapport she establishes with her classes. She is held in considerable affection and respect by her students and I know that they will be equally delighted to hear of her having won this national award.”

Khylee joined the Auckland Law School in 1998, having practiced in criminal and family law for three years. She is from the iwi of Te Roroa/ Ngāpuhi/ and Ngāti Porou.

She teaches criminal law, advanced criminal law and youth justice. Her research interests are within these fields, in particular Māori and the criminal justice system, tikanga Māori and the law, restorative justice and alternative dispute resolution, Māori women and the law, and indigenous peoples and the law.
The tertiary teaching awards are administered by Ako Aotearoa – the National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence, which aims to recognised and celebrate excellence in tertiary teaching and share good practice that has proven benefit for learners.


ends


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