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High tea to celebrate Albany scholarship winners

Wednesday, July 2, 2014
High tea to celebrate Albany scholarship winners

Border security and disease management, the relationship between wairua and well-being in women, the best ways to support dementia in our ageing population and the diet of the kakariki are just some of the topics being researched by scholarship winners at Massey University.

Seven Massey students received scholarships to the value of $13,000 from the Federation of Graduate Women (NZFGW) North Shore, at a high tea held on the Albany campus recently. The awards were presented by Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research and Enterprise Professor Bridgid Heywood.

PhD student Jennifer Laycock was named 2014 NZFGW North Shore Branch Scholar of the Year, receiving an award of $4000. Ms Laycock is investigating the epidemiology of chytrid fungis in New Zealand amphibians with a particular emphasis on introduced species of amphibians. This research aims to provide a link between border security and responses to disease management, and will help develop practical solutions to protect New Zealand’s fragile amphibian biodiversity. Ms Laycock was in Townsville conducting research, so her award was collected by her daughter Elora Hallett.

Psychology student Alison McKinlay received $2000 for research costs towards her PhD, which will look at how best to support the ageing population, and in particular people with early dementia and mild cognitive impairment. Master of Psychology student Paulette Ripikoi also received $2000 towards her research into the relationship between wairua and wellbeing for women involved in the Mana Wahine project on the North Shore. Amy Waldmann, studying for a Master of Science in Conservation Biology, also received $2000 to assist with the costs of her research on the diet and foraging ecology of the red crowned kakariki.


Three first-year students who were all high achievers in their schools were also presented with awards. Georgina Cresswell, formerly of Carmel College is studying towards a Bachelor of Engineering, majoring in mechatronics. Takapuna Grammar alumna Anezka Hoskin is studying a double degree in humanities and sciences, majoring in Māori studies and genetics, and Ji-Eun Lee, formerly of Northcote College, is now studying for a Bachelor of Business Studies majoring in economics and business management.

NZFGW North Shore Awards committee chair Frances Bell says the scholarships provide tangible support for women wanting to further their education.

“We know that education is really important, not only for its own sake, but we recognise its special importance in opening up opportunities for women – and we want to support these women,” she says.

Albany campus registrar Andrea Davies says the high tea is always a great occasion.

“It’s wonderful being able to help these great students build strong networks of support so that they can go on to do great work that makes a difference. They get to meet passionate academics like Dr Bobbie Hunter, and are mentored by the best – with two of the winning postgraduate students supervised by Professor Dianne Brunton. It’s a wonderful celebration.”

Funds are raised through the voluntary work of branch members, who help with the huge challenge of providing academic regalia for Massey graduation ceremonies on the North Shore. In addition to the awards presented, Graduate Women North Shore also supports further awards through the NZFGW Fellowship Fund, which offers scholarships for advanced study, and the New Horizons for Women Trust, which supports mature women beginning tertiary study.

For more information on scholarships available from the New Zealand Federation of Graduate Women, go to: http://www.nzfgw.org.nz/scholarships-grants-and-awards/

For more information on scholarships available at Massey go to: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/admission/scholarships-bursaries-awards/


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