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Free Courses Can Kick-start Careers

Media Release 9 July 2014

Free Courses Can Kick-start Careers

Northlanders are being offered the chance to study for free at NorthTec, starting this month.

Fees-free programmes include business administration, painting, construction, forestry, agriculture and foundation studies.

The courses mostly last for around six months and give students a great start towards a career or further studies, earning them a certificate or national certificate and giving them a range of skills.

The free programmes don’t just offer the chance to acquire skills and knowledge – they also come with a range of goodies, like free tools to give painting and construction students a head-start in the workforce or gym membership for sport and recreation students.

The majority of the courses start on Monday 21 July and enrolment is taking place now. Courses are offered from NorthTec’s Whangarei campuses as well as learning centres throughout Northland.

There are no entry restrictions, meaning that the fees-free courses are open to anybody who wants to gain extra skills or take the first step into tertiary study.

Following government changes last year, all foundation education level two courses are free to 16 to 24-year-olds.

Former student Jonathon Sole, who completed a Certificate in Mechanical Engineering, recommends the course for the employment opportunities it brings. He said: “This course gives heaps of opportunities because employers come here looking for good employees.”

Business Administration student, Desiree Norman, said the course taught her more than just the basics of running a business. She said: “I love what we learn here but also the way we learn it. We do lots of role plays and demonstrations so we’re not just learning on paper.”

Construction student, Daniel Munn, said: “The tutors here make it so easy to learn. I hated maths at school but here they work with you one on one until you get it.”

The following fees-free courses are available at NorthTec from 21 July:

• Certificate in General Farm Skills (Level 3) – Whangarei and Kaitaia

• Certificate in Elementary Construction (Level 2) – Whangarei, Panguru, Dargaville, Silverdale, Kaiwaka, Kaikohe, Moerewa*

• Certificate in Sustainable Rural Development (Level 2) – Whangarei, Parua Bay, Herekino, Kaitaia, Kawakawa, Kerikeri, Whirinaki

• Certificate in Sustainable Rural Development (Level 3) – Kaitaia, Rawene, Awanui, Kaikohe, Paparoa, Albany, Kawakawa, Kerikeri

• Certificate in Painting (Trade) (Level 2) – Silverdale, Kaiwaka*

• Certificate in Foundation Studies (Level 2) – Whangarei, Kaitaia

• Certificate in Mechanical Engineering – Whangarei

• Certificate in Foundation Studies, Sport & Recreation focus (Level 2) – Whangarei, Kaitaia, Whangapaora

• Certificate in Foundation Studies, Arts focus (Level 2) – Rawene

• National Certificate in Horticulture (level 3) – Panguru, Whangaparaoa

• National Certificate in Agriculture (general Skills) (Level 2)– Whangarei, Far North, Rodney

• National Certificate in Business Administration and Computing (Level 2) – Rawene/Kaikohe*

• Community Computing – Whangarei, Kerikeri, Rawene, Kaitaia

• Youth Guarantee for 16 – 19 year-olds – Whangarei, Rawene, Kaitaia, Kaikohe, Kawakawa, Helensville

The following programmes start in August:

• Certificate in Forestry (Forest industries) (Level 2) –Whangarei and Kaitaia

• Certificate in Foundation Forestry Skills (Level 2) – Moerewa

• Certificate in Tourism and Hospitality Skills (Level 2) – Whangarei*

For further information about these and other NorthTec courses, go to www.northtec.ac.nz or phone 0800 162 100.

*These courses are fees-free for 16 – 24 year olds. Conditions may apply to other students.


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