Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Every child is nurtured at Little Feet Preschool, Auckland

Every child is valued and nurtured at Little Feet Preschool, Auckland

Little Feet Preschool is a privately owned centre located near Sylvia Park in Mount Wellington, Auckland.

It was opened in 1998 and the centre welcomes all families and children and provides an attractive and well maintained learning environment. The children enjoy respectful relationships with staff and peer (tuakana/teina) relationships between children are encouraged.

Children attend the full day, morning or afternoon sessions, allowing parents to use the 20 free hour provision for children over three years. We provide all meals and also play an important role in creating a culture of healthy eating and in helping children to develop the healthy food behaviours that will support them to grow into healthy adults.

Every child comes to school with a unique personality and learning style and Little Feet preschool features a team of highly trained staff who provide the children with a safe, fun environment where they can express themselves creatively. The children have access to a huge outdoor area, very good resources and a wide range of interesting and appropriate activities. They enjoy the centres well organised and attractive environment.

Little Feet also caters for up to eight babies. Each one of them receives personal attention in a warm nurturing environment that is tailored to suit their individual needs. The team at Little Feet is professionally trained to observe and enhance your babies’ developmental skills.

Little Feet Preschool aims to be a centre which works in partnership with whanau to enhance their child’s learning journey, as we value their input as the people who know their children best. It has a weekly curriculum which is based on Te Whariki principles. These principles, aims and goals, are an integrated approach woven from Te Whariki to have a holistic approach to the centre’s curriculum. Children at Little Feet are observed in their play and as a result the curriculum is based on those observations. This means that it is stimulating and flexible and designed to meet the changing needs of the children in care.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news