Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Fast forward through architecture and planning

Fast forward through architecture and planning

Outstanding practitioners in the fields of architecture, planning and urban design will present their work for discussion and debate at the upcoming Fast Forward lecture series.

Hosted by the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of Auckland, this coming series includes lectures by eminent local and international architects and planners, as well as sessions focusing on particular issues in Auckland and Christchurch.


Starting next week, the first event, led by award-winning Architect David Mitchell, features the creative team behind New Zealand’s exhibition at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale.

Cities in transition will be profiled by Josie Schroder, the Principal Advisor of Urban Design for the Christ-church City Council. She will discuss the rebuild with a spotlight on innovation and community engagement.

Alongside the lectures, two important new architecture books will be officially launched; Julia Gatley and Paul Walker’s ‘Vertical Living: The Architectural Centre and the Remaking of Welling-ton’, and Andrew Barrie’s ‘Shigeru Ban: Cardboard Cathedral’.

And in recognition of the significance of the upcoming General Election, a highlight of this year’s Fast Forward lecture series will be a pre-election debate among well-known politicians who will address the issue of the lack of affordable, quality housing available in the Supercity. Of increasing concern to most residents, candidates will outline to the public their party’s vision for the future of housing in Auckland.

The final lecture will feature Architect in Residence, Emeritus Professor George Baird from the University of Toronto. Baird is the founding principal of award-winning architecture and urban design firm Baird Sampson Neuert Architects, and author of numerous books including Alvar Aalto (1969), The Space of Appearance (1995) and Public Space; Cultural/Political Theory; Street Photog-raphy (2011).
In 2012 he was awarded the American Institute of Architects and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Ar-chitecture Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architectural Education.

Running from mid-July to mid-October events include:
• 22 July, 6pm - NZIA in Venice: ‘Last, loneliest, loveliest’ - the New Zealand exhibition at the 14th Venice Architecture Biennale.
David Mitchell and the Creative Team who made the NZ exhibition at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale will talk about the basis of the show, the work on display, building the exhibition, and the launch in Venice.
Panel: Dr Mike Austin, Pete Bossley, Pip Cheshire, Frances Cooper, Chai Lin Sara Lee, Julian Mitchell, Ginny Pedlow, Julie Stout and Miriam Van Wezel.

• 29 July, 5pm - Launch of Julia Gatley and Paul Walker’s new book ‘Vertical Living: The Architec-tural Centre and the Remaking of Wellington’.

• 29 July, 6pm - Professor Paul Walker: Demolishing brutalism: John Andrews and the Sydney Convention Centre.

• 5 August, 6pm – Ree Anderson: Auckland’s Housing Project Office: A potential legacy.

• 12 August, 5pm – Launch of Andrew Barrie’s new book ‘Shigeru Ban: Cardboard Cathedral’

• 12 August, 6pm – Hugh Tennent: Action and reflection: Current and recent works of Tennent and Brown.

• 19 August, 6pm – Patrick Clifford: The fourth decade.

• 26 August, 6pm – Josie Shroder: Breaking old ground: Post disaster innovation in re-establishing Christchurch.

• 2 September, 6pm – Election debate: Market forces or bold policy? Achieving affordable qual-ity housing in Auckland.

• 9 September, 6pm – Andrew Leach: The Gold Coast moment.

• 21 October, 6pm – George Baird.
All events are free and open to the public. For more information on each event please visitwww.creative.auckland.ac.nz/fastforward
ENDS

The University of Auckland’s National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries comprises the Elam School of Fine Arts, School of Architecture and Planning, the Centre for Art Studies, the School of Music and the Dance Studies Programme.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Education
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news