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Te Reo lives at CPIT

Te Reo lives at CPIT

Te Reo is alive and well at CPIT and to prove it, CPIT has a week of events and activities planned from 21 to 25 July designed to help everyone expand their knowledge of Māori language.

Māori Language Week (Te Wiki o Te Reo) is an annual, national event where the country recognises and celebrates Māori culture.

Manu Whata, CPIT Te Kaiwhakauru Māori/Māori Engagement Officer, says the purpose of the week is increase awareness of Māori language and culture at CPIT, as well as to increase use of Māori language.

“Although we would like to see this happening every day of the year, this is one concentrated week where Māori language is recognised all over the country. It’s on the news, it’s on the radio, it’s everywhere,” he says.

“We would like to see our students get involved, try out a bit of the language and learn a bit about Māori culture.”

The theme for this year’s celebrations at CPIT is “Te Reo Lives here”.

The week will kick off on Monday July 21 with waiata and chants from Te Puna Wānaka students and speeches from CPIT’s key note speakers, Chief Executive Kay Giles and Kaiarahi Hana O’Regan.

During the week, there will also be Māori weaving, music, food and a fierce competition between Canterbury secondary schools as they compete in a range of Te Reo Māori based events.

Whata was most looking forward to community involvement in this year’s festivities.

“We’ve got community participation for two days during the week, where they will come in and have classes on art and stories. It’s a good chance for people at CPIT to learn about the wider Māori community and for them to come and see what we do here at CPIT.”

Another highlight of the week will be a visit from three tattoo artists trained in the traditional art of tāmoko, or Māori tattooing. Students and staff will be able to learn about the practice from tattoo artists Henare Brookings, Steve Punga Smith and Maia Gibbs and even get a tattoo of their own if they wish.

“We’ve got some students booked in already to get tāmoko. The artists are very well renowned so it is a real honour to have them here,” Whata says.

CPIT’s library will be running an event to learn about macrons and the Māori language. Students will be able to learn about macron use, how to use macrons on the computer and they will even get to consume a Macron biscuit.

This year, Māori Language Week also coincides with The Return (student orientation) at CPIT, so students will have plenty to do around both our Madras St Campus and CPIT Trades.

For information about Māori Language Week events at CPIT see or phone 0800 24 24 76. Also, keep your eyes peeled on social media for the hashtag #TeReoLivesHere to join in the fun.

© Scoop Media

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