Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Wine, architecture and the tourism experience

23 July 2014

Wine, architecture and the tourism experience

Architecture is a key factor in the creation of food and wine tourism experiences say researchers at Victoria University of Wellington.

Dr Julia Albrecht from the School of Management and Tobias Danielmeier from the School of Architecture are working together to understand the interrelationship between architecture, and the way people experience hospitality spaces, such as wineries.

Dr Albrecht, a senior lecturer in tourism management, says wineries have only become destinations for visitors in the last 30 years, changing the way they function and look.

“For example, a winery in Marlborough has built a Tuscany-like tower structure which is only for the benefit of visitors—it doesn’t have any function to how the wine is made, stored, or anything else to do with the product,” she says.

The researchers are interested in what architecture can add in terms of value to the visitor experience. Mr Danielmeier, a senior lecturer in architecture, says although people know it’s set up to look and feel a certain way, they visit and have a good time.

“Some architects have even gone beyond what you’d expect them to do, for example, designing things like cutlery and plates as well,” he says. “The question is, do you need to build something authentic in order for people to have fun?”

The researchers will present their findings at a free talk during Visa Wellington On a Plate in August, discussing the possible futures of winery visitations. The talk will be based on their chapter in a forthcoming book titled The Future of Food Tourism, co-edited by Dr Albrecht and Dr Ian Yeoman, an associate professor in Victoria’s School of Management.

They will also provide a historical perspective of culinary experiences and architecture more generally, looking at how the tastes of various times has been reflected not only in the food, but also in the buildings.

“The enjoyment of food has a long relationship with the spatial component attached to it. We’re interested in the performance of design and how it’s used to add value,” says Mr Danielmeier.

“The relevance of architecture, and spatial experience more generally, is vastly underestimated. Where a product is experienced is rarely thought about, and wineries are just one example of that. This is where potential linkages to architecture research can enrich tourism product development,” says Dr Albrecht.

For more information about Wellington On a Plate visit www.wellingtononaplate.com/events/architecture-and-culinary-experiences/.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Fringe Review: Rossum’s Universal Robots

Written in 1920 by Karel Capek in a newly independent Czechoslovakia, its prophetic tale of artificial intelligence, automata and human morality was initially a big hit, but it then vanished from view, in New Zealand at least, before being revived in Hamilton last year. More>>

SELECT FRINGE SHOWS:

Pictures Of Media: Call For Photographs For Reimagining Journalism

In August this year Freerange Press is launching its next big book. This time we are gathering the best writers and thinkers in the country to look at the changing media landscape in New Zealand. To illuminate and give voice to the writing we want to include around 25 excellent photos. We want these photos to document the different aspects of how journalism is made, how it used to be, and how it is changing. More>>

Safer Internet Day: Keeping Safe Online More Important Than Ever

Tuesday 9 February marks Safer Internet Day. Safer Internet Day is designed to create awareness about the importance of Internet safety and encourages positive use of technology - with a strong focus on young people. More>>

ALSO:

We Have The Technology: Zephyrometer Up And Moving

“The needle’s stoppers had to be repaired because of the extra impact caused by the balance not being correct. We also added an extra 300kgs counter-balance – made from zinc coated steel triangle plates. These adjustments will now stop it bending low over the road in high winds.” More>>

ALSO:

Waitangi Day: Treaty Of Waitangi - Found In Translation

To celebrate the Society of Translators and Interpreters's 30th anniversary, over 90 translators will work together to translate the English and Māori versions of the Treaty of Waitangi into 30 languages... More>>

ALSO:

Northland Development: Trust Applauds $4m Government Funding For Art Centre

Today's announcement of central government support, made by Minister of Economic Development Steven Joyce, provides a key step forward in funding for Whangarei’s Hundertwasser Art Centre & Wairau Maori Art Gallery. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news