Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Wine, architecture and the tourism experience

23 July 2014

Wine, architecture and the tourism experience

Architecture is a key factor in the creation of food and wine tourism experiences say researchers at Victoria University of Wellington.

Dr Julia Albrecht from the School of Management and Tobias Danielmeier from the School of Architecture are working together to understand the interrelationship between architecture, and the way people experience hospitality spaces, such as wineries.

Dr Albrecht, a senior lecturer in tourism management, says wineries have only become destinations for visitors in the last 30 years, changing the way they function and look.

“For example, a winery in Marlborough has built a Tuscany-like tower structure which is only for the benefit of visitors—it doesn’t have any function to how the wine is made, stored, or anything else to do with the product,” she says.

The researchers are interested in what architecture can add in terms of value to the visitor experience. Mr Danielmeier, a senior lecturer in architecture, says although people know it’s set up to look and feel a certain way, they visit and have a good time.

“Some architects have even gone beyond what you’d expect them to do, for example, designing things like cutlery and plates as well,” he says. “The question is, do you need to build something authentic in order for people to have fun?”

The researchers will present their findings at a free talk during Visa Wellington On a Plate in August, discussing the possible futures of winery visitations. The talk will be based on their chapter in a forthcoming book titled The Future of Food Tourism, co-edited by Dr Albrecht and Dr Ian Yeoman, an associate professor in Victoria’s School of Management.

They will also provide a historical perspective of culinary experiences and architecture more generally, looking at how the tastes of various times has been reflected not only in the food, but also in the buildings.

“The enjoyment of food has a long relationship with the spatial component attached to it. We’re interested in the performance of design and how it’s used to add value,” says Mr Danielmeier.

“The relevance of architecture, and spatial experience more generally, is vastly underestimated. Where a product is experienced is rarely thought about, and wineries are just one example of that. This is where potential linkages to architecture research can enrich tourism product development,” says Dr Albrecht.

For more information about Wellington On a Plate visit www.wellingtononaplate.com/events/architecture-and-culinary-experiences/.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Wellington Rugby Zeroes: Sevens To Move To Hamilton

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester: “The Sevens has been a big part of recent Wellington history but it was time for the event to move on… Wellingtonians have been voting with their feet in the last few years and we’ve seen the result in dwindling crowd numbers and lower ticket sales.” More>>

ALSO:

Matafeo & Dravid: The Billy T And Fred Award Winners For 2017

At the final show of the 2017 NZ International Comedy Festival powered by Flick Electric Co. the Festival came to a close after 115 shows in Auckland and 68 shows in Wellington. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: What’s Fair? Tax and Fairness

This is an excellent and timely book, since apart from general statements about increasing or mostly reducing tax, there has been very little comment or debate as to whether we should pay tax at all and how much tax should each of us pay. More>>

Ockham Awards: Globally Lauded Novelist Wins NZ’s Biggest Fiction Prize

Internationally renowned Ngāruawāhia resident Catherine Chidgey has won New Zealand’s richest writing award, the $50,000 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize, for her novel The Wish Child. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland