Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Japanese-Kiwi researchers to collaborate on new robotics

Japanese-Kiwi researchers funded to collaborate on new robotics

A new lightweight robotic arm is just one of the projects to be developed under a new collaboration between University of Auckland and Japanese research teams working on robotics and assistive devices for the elderly.

A new lightweight robotic arm is just one of the projects to be developed under a new collaboration between University of Auckland and Japanese research teams working on robotics and assistive devices for the elderly.

Funding of $150,000 from the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment will be invested over three years for two multi-institutional projects: one from the University of Auckland Bioengineering Institute and Callaghan Innovation, and the other from the University’s Robotics Research Group and the University of Canterbury.

Like New Zealand, Japan has an increasingly ageing population and the two countries are key collaborators in science and innovation in the robotics field.

“The fit for us is a good one with New Zealand’s expertise in software and human-robot interaction matching well with Japan’s strong hardware capability,” says Associate Professor Bruce MacDonald who has developed the iRobi Healthbots under the University of Auckland’s Robotics Research Group.

The Healthbots can do a range of tasks but trials at Auckland’s Selwyn Retirement Village found that, as well as fulfilling a care function, people enjoyed the company of their automated helpers.

“We want to help older people to be more independent and happier and more socially interactive using robots that can do simple tasks, everything from reminding patients to take medication to providing a Skype calling service,” Associate Professor MacDonald says.

The new collaboration under the New Zealand Japan Strategic Partnership Building in Robotics and Human Assistive Devices for Elderly Care was supported by MBIE to strengthen the partnership between New Zealand and Japan to help drive economic growth through science and innovation.

The University of Auckland is also involved in a project led by Callaghan Innovation that focuses on improvements to a robotic assistive walking suit being developed in conjunction with the Japanese Shinshu University.

Associate Professor Thor Besier of the Auckland Bioengineering Institute and Dr Angus McMorland of Sport & Exercise Science are teaming up to develop a novel ‘motion controller’ for the Japanese exoskeleton, and plan to use this new device to assist patients recovering from stroke. The project leverages sensing technology from NZ companies IMeasureU and StretchSense, providing new export opportunities for these high tech start-ups.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news