Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search


Imagining the future of food

5 August 2014

Imagining the future of food

Steak grown from stem cells in the laboratory or local produce from urban high-rises may be on our menus in the year 2050, according to Victoria of Wellington students.

As part of the Visa Wellington On a Plate Festival programme, students from Victoria’s Bachelor of Tourism Management Honour’s programme will present four scenarios about the future of food festivals, drawing on the latest research and industry viewpoints.

Futurist Dr Ian Yeoman, an associate professor at Victoria Business School, is supervising the postgraduate students. He says the two most likely scenarios for the future of tourism are exclusivity, where food is explored as a luxury experience, or scientifically created food.

“Issues such as climate change, pollution, over-population, dying seas and depleted resources could mean that food is scarce and expensive in the future,” says Dr Yeoman. “As a result real food could become an exclusive experience for rich tourists, focusing on authenticity and rare foods from the past.”

Dr Yeoman says science could provide solutions to food shortages. “In vitro meat products, which involves culturing muscle tissue in a liquid medium, have already been grown successfully, and these could be produced on a large scale,” he says.

“Scientists could also develop new genetically modified applications of food, such as metabolically engineered fish that mature more quickly or fruit and nut trees that yield faster.”

He also envisions vertical farming, an agricultural technique involving large-scale architecture in urban high-rises or ‘farmscrapers’. Using advanced greenhouse technology and methods such as hydroponics, these buildings would produce fruit and vegetables all year round.

“Vertical farming would provide a controlled, protective environment for crops, independent of weather and most extreme weather events, thereby significantly increasing agricultural productivity,” he says.

Dr Yeoman also says scientists may be able to replicate food, using the food’s molecular structure.

“Although this may sound like science fiction, NASA recently contracted Systems and Materials Research Corporation to build a 3D printer to produce nutritious and flavourful mission supplies for astronauts. One of the first foods is expected to be pizza.”

2050: The Future of Food Festivals
Date: 18 August, 6-7pm
Venue: Rutherford House, Lecture Room 3 (RHLT3) 23 Lambton Quay, Wellington


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

On Shoestrings And Phones: Rossellini And Contemporary Film

Howard Davis: Roberto Rossellini's Neo-Realist Rome, Open City provides some fascinating technical parallels to Tangerine, an equally revolutionary Independent movie made exactly seventy years later. More>>

Art Review: Fiona Pardington's A Beautiful Hesitation

An aroma of death and decay perfumes this extraordinary survey of Fiona Pardington's work with faint forensic scents of camphor and formaldehyde. Eight large-format still-lifes dominate the main room, while other works reveal progressive developments in style and subject-matter. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news