Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Website puts your questions to political parties

August 5, 2014

Website puts your questions to political parties

It’s called Ask Away, and that’s exactly what the designer of an election question and answer web platform wants prospective voters to do by putting questions online to respective political party representatives.

The website, designed by Massey University Master of Design student Meg Howie, then lets representatives from each party log in each day to respond to the most popular questions, ranging from and including health to housing to tertiary education, as voted by website users.

Party spokespeople responsible for those issues will be answering questions on the site up till polling day, September 20, giving people an easy way to get informed and involved this election.

“It’s about making it as easy as possible for the parties to respond to the issues the public care most about,” Ms Howie says.

“It’s also about including the people who are less informed, and who don’t know how policies affect them and don’t have in-depth knowledge about politics. If you don’t have a question to ask, you can vote for questions that are important to you. By voting up a question to increase its likelihood of getting answered, you’re helping to shape the discussion for this election.”

The platform is targeting youth, as this is one of the groups that have historically been significantly under-represented in voter turnout. “Voter participation levels in New Zealand are rapidly declining and we need to do something about it,” Ms Howie says.

“I hope that by providing a platform for youth perspectives this election, Ask Away will help break down the perception that politics aren’t relevant to young people, and that it will also help the candidates become more aware of the issues that are affecting youth.”

The Ask Away website is part of Massey’s Design & Democracy Project, which explores design research solutions for encouraging civic engagement, with a focus this year on building youth electoral participation.

Content from the website will also feature as part of the online election coverage of Radio New Zealand, and also its youth platform The Wireless.

Digital editor Alex van Wel of Radionz.co.nz described Ask Away as a new and innovative way to empower voters in a general election, giving them a chance to define the issues during the campaign by drawing attention to the questions directly relevant to them and prompting discussions separate to those triggered by the political parties.

Many web developers, including several from Code for New Zealand and the Enspiral Foundation, are donating time to build the platform. As it is under an Open Source License anyone will be able to use the code and Ms Howie hopes that it will be used for similar purposes internationally.

The site will be live from August 8 at www.askaway.org.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Super Rugby: Parade To Celebrate Highlanders’ Win

The Dunedin City Council is urging people to come along on Monday to congratulate the team on its win in Wellington tonight. The Highlanders will leave from outside the Dental School at midday. More>>

ALSO:

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news