Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Stellar Fashion Student Stars in Awards


Misty Ratima with her winning design, modelled by her daughter Ocean Ratima. (Photo: Diane Wilkie)

Media Release

Stellar Fashion Student Stars in Awards

A star achiever in the Hokonui Fashion Awards, EIT student Misty Ratima was inspired by the Māori celebration of Mātariki.

The final-year fashion design student won the national competition’s Auaha Special Award, an open category which celebrates innovation and creativity. Her entry, a dress and steep-collared jacket, features a front panel of intricately woven diamond shapes symbolising the Seven Sisters of Mātariki or Pleiades cluster of stars.

The colours used for the woven detail are red and tan, alluding to Papatūānuku (Earth Mother), white and silver for Ranginui (Sky Father) and the shimmering stars.

While the mother-of-four occasionally sews at home for herself and her children, aged five to 17, her entry in the Hokonui Fashion Design Awards was the first time she had submitted work in competition.

A main focus for Misty’s fashion design is her Māori culture – she is of Ngāti Kahungunu descent and her hapū is Ngāi Te Rangikoianake of Te Hauke. Her first year of tertiary study was at New Zealand Fashion Tech in Auckland where, she says, she learnt sewing techniques and garment construction.

Returning to Hawke’s Bay after 17 years in Auckland, she graduated last year with her Bachelor of Arts (Māori) at EIT’s Te Uranga Waka.

“Ideas and concepts for my designs are derived from what I learnt there,” she says.

After completing the degree, Misty enrolled in EIT’s Certificate of Fashion Apparel.

“I’m enjoying the programme and it’s teaching me small business, design and patternmaking skills.”

Misty is also enjoying the dynamics of a class where students range in age and focus, from creative school leavers to career-oriented mature students.

When she finishes her studies at the end of this year, she plans launching her own business designing and manufacturing contemporary streetwear.

“Hitting my teens in the ‘90s, I had developed a strong passion for hip hop and R n B. It wasn’t just about the music though. I fell in love with the fashion, dance moves, grafitti art, music videos, street culture and freedom of explicit expression.

“My dream, is to create a streetwear label that encompasses all of those elements, which can be differentiated and identifiable through contemporary Māori design. It’ll be a clothing label that is uniquely Aotearoa.”

Living in Clive, Misty sees herself based in Hawke’s Bay for the foreseeable future unless, of course, a once-in- a- lifetime opportunity presents itself.

She uses a lot of block colours in her designs and the inspiration for embellishing garments includes tukutuku panels, tāniko weaving, traditional stories and natural surroundings. And she says her mother, Mihi Ratima, continues to be a huge influence on her work – “she is my creative muse”.

“Winning the Hokonui award was unexpected but exciting,” Misty says. “More than anything the win recognises the creative aspect of my design and I created it with my Māori cultural heritage in mind.”

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Education
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news