Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Reimagining disability: Ground-breaking new research

13 August 2014

Reimagining disability: Ground-breaking new research

University of Waikato PhD candidate Ingrid Jones is conducting ground-breaking new research into changing the way society thinks about disability. Her research, entitled “Reimagining disability: Towards learning disability pride” aims to explore the concepts of disability pride and ableism with a group of learning (intellectually) disabled people.

“Having a disability is largely viewed as having a problem, when it shouldn’t be,” she says. “It’s just a part of the diversity of humanity. The reason we have disability oppression is because society views disability as a problem. Being “able” is seen as the norm, when society is more diverse than that.”

The words “learning disability” are used in the research instead of the more commonly-used “intellectual disability”, as this is the term disabled persons’ organisation People First has chosen as a label for itself. Ingrid believes it is vital that society respects the labels that marginalised groups choose for themselves.

Ingrid will be working with learning-disabled people as they develop a different way of looking at learning disability. She’ll be using a technique called Participatory Action Research, PAR, an approach to research that involves participants having an active, participatory role in the project.

At the beginning of next year, Ingrid will start work with a group of about eight learning-disabled people and a learning-disabled co-facilitator through a series of eight hui.

“People who aren’t disabled are going to get it wrong for disabled people because we approach it from a position of imagining what it would be like to be disabled, and having a fear of that. I believe the answers need to come from disabled people, but first they need to have a strong sense of pride in who they are and it needs to be because of who they are, not in spite of who they are.”

As part of her research, Ingrid will be investigating the language around learning disability. She believes that society only has negative ways of thinking and talking about disability.

“There’s been a big change in theory in the lives of disabled people, in particular those with learning disabilities. Often they live in poverty, are disconnected, and have little control over their lives so I’m saying it’s the way that we are thinking about the ‘problem’ of disability that needs to change, and this is why I’m conducting participatory research. The answers need to come from people with learning disabilities themselves.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

TV3 Video: Auckland Arts Festival Kicks Off

The Auckland Arts Festival kicks off March 4, with artists from New Zealand and all over the world on show. More>>

ALSO:

Te Matatini: Minister Applauds National Kapa Haka Festival

Education Minister Hekia Parata wishes the best of luck to everyone involved in this week’s national kapa haka festival, Te Matatini, in Christchurch. “Te Matatini showcases the very best of Māori performing arts talent. It’s a celebration of identity, language and culture at the highest level and I’m looking forward to being amongst it,” says Ms Parata. More>>

ALSO:

Kiwi Pride: Accolades For Film About Man Who Falls In Love With A Stick

A short animated film written and directed by New Zealand born Matthew Darragh has been selected for the Courts des îles, International Festival of Short Fiction Films. More>>

ALSO:

Anniversaries: Vivid Memories Four Years After Christchurch Quake

Four years ago, an earthquake that would change the lives of thousands shook Christchurch at 12.51 p.m. More>>

ALSO:

Environment 'n' Conservation: Slash Meets Tāne The Tuatara

Rock and Roll superstar and former Guns 'n' Roses guitarist Slash visited Zealandia Ecosanctuary along with collaborating band Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators. More>>

Canterbury Quakes: Feedback Sought On Short-Listed Memorial Designs

Six short-listed designs for the Canterbury Earthquake Memorial have been released for public input... The Memorial will honour the victims of Canterbury’s earthquakes and acknowledge the suffering of all those who lived through them as well as the heroism of those who participated in the rescue and recovery operations. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news