Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Trust Ownership and the Future of News

Trust Ownership and the Future of News

A new book by University of Auckland Honorary Academic Dr Gavin Ellis debates how the public would be better served by media if some news organisations were run as trusts instead of being owned by large corporations expected to make a profit.

In his book, Trust Ownership and the Future of News: Media Moguls and White Knights, Dr Ellis, a former Editor–in-Chief of the New Zealand Herald, claims a trust structure can sustain the forms of journalism necessary in a free, functioning democracy and engender public confidence in the news media.

This ground-breaking study examines the past and present use of trustee governance by newspapers, public service broadcasters and news agencies in the United Kingdom, Ireland, the United States, Canada, South Africa, India, Australia and New Zealand. Its case studies of the Guardian, Irish Timesand Tampa Bay Times – plus examination of the family trusts behind the Daily Mail, New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post – detail the principles, practices and lessons of trustee ownership that can be applied by the digital 'new media' generation entrusted with the future of news.

He believes if new media in particular were put into a trust model of ownership, then they could focus on more serious forms of news such as government policy and investigative journalism.

Dr Ellis says mainstream New Zealand media is currently focused on profit and operated by large corporations. It may be competitive, but is it serving the public well when the emphasis is often on celebrity news, gossip and death?

A recent example is the tragic suicide of actor Robin Williams that lead both 3News and One News and filled many column centimetres of the Herald the following morning.

“It’s a tragic event, no one’s denying that, but that amount of coverage cannot be justified,” he says.

“I used to say when I was an editor ‘never underestimate the power of death’, but it has to be kept in some sort of balance. It is capturing the media more and more.

“It’s taking us to an increasingly cathartic time when we’re going to have to decide what’s important to society, do we need to have the mediated forms of communication that journalism provides?”

Dr Ellis says that contrary to popular belief, competition is not always the answer to improving the quality. Instead of media competing to break different stories: “It seems to be the pack all following the same bone.”

He also investigates how, while a lot has been written about the decline of journalism itself, little attention is paid to making constructive attempts to find alternative structures journalists can work in to improve the quality and range of reported news.

Dr Ellis returns to the University of Auckland in 2015 to teach a Summer School course on Propaganda.

Trust_Ownership_and_the_Future_of_News_2.pdf

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: No Longer An Island

Simon Nathan reviews 'Zealandia: Our Continent Revealed': The idea that New Zealand is part of a large submerged continent is not new... There was renewed interest in the extent of offshore New Zealand from the 1970s onwards with the start of offshore drilling for oil and gas, and this was given impetus by a UN agreement which allowed countries to claim an Extended Continental Shelf (ECS). More>>

Art: Simon Denny Recreates Kim Dotcom’s Personal Effects

Who owns what? How has the internet changed our relation to the world? These are two of the many questions Simon Denny raises in the latest exhibition at the Adam Art Gallery, opening on Saturday 4 October. More>>

Theatre: The F Word: Sex Without The 'ism'

Sex without the 'ism' Okay, so the sexes are equal in the eyes of the law. What the F happens now? More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Don’t Eat The Fish

On 'The Catch' by Michael Field What the ecologically edible lists don’t appear to take into account – and they should – is slavery... It’s not an easy read, but it’s definitely near the top of my listicle of “5 Political Books You Must Read This Year”. More>>

ALSO:

Caracals: Small Cats With Big Ears Arrive At Wellington Zoo

Visitors to Wellington Zoo will be able to see New Zealand’s first Caracals in the Zoo’s new Grassland Cats habitat, with a special visitor opening day on Saturday 27 September. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: Classics - Tales From Moominvalley
Can’t speak for the reading end of it but the Moomins ( or maybe the story about Margaret Wise Brown) were the most enjoyable subject to think about and write about during these whole first 50 issues of Werewolf. For that reason – and because the Moomins always reward re-reading – I’ve decided to reprint it. The only added element is a link to an interesting hour long documentary about Tove Jansson. More>>

ALSO:

Repping In The Pacific: All Blacks And Manu Samoa To Play Historic Apia Test

The All Blacks will play Manu Samoa in Apia on Wednesday 8 July next year as part of both teams’ preparations for Rugby World Cup 2015. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news