Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Trust Ownership and the Future of News

Trust Ownership and the Future of News

A new book by University of Auckland Honorary Academic Dr Gavin Ellis debates how the public would be better served by media if some news organisations were run as trusts instead of being owned by large corporations expected to make a profit.

In his book, Trust Ownership and the Future of News: Media Moguls and White Knights, Dr Ellis, a former Editor–in-Chief of the New Zealand Herald, claims a trust structure can sustain the forms of journalism necessary in a free, functioning democracy and engender public confidence in the news media.

This ground-breaking study examines the past and present use of trustee governance by newspapers, public service broadcasters and news agencies in the United Kingdom, Ireland, the United States, Canada, South Africa, India, Australia and New Zealand. Its case studies of the Guardian, Irish Timesand Tampa Bay Times – plus examination of the family trusts behind the Daily Mail, New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post – detail the principles, practices and lessons of trustee ownership that can be applied by the digital 'new media' generation entrusted with the future of news.

He believes if new media in particular were put into a trust model of ownership, then they could focus on more serious forms of news such as government policy and investigative journalism.

Dr Ellis says mainstream New Zealand media is currently focused on profit and operated by large corporations. It may be competitive, but is it serving the public well when the emphasis is often on celebrity news, gossip and death?

A recent example is the tragic suicide of actor Robin Williams that lead both 3News and One News and filled many column centimetres of the Herald the following morning.

“It’s a tragic event, no one’s denying that, but that amount of coverage cannot be justified,” he says.

“I used to say when I was an editor ‘never underestimate the power of death’, but it has to be kept in some sort of balance. It is capturing the media more and more.

“It’s taking us to an increasingly cathartic time when we’re going to have to decide what’s important to society, do we need to have the mediated forms of communication that journalism provides?”

Dr Ellis says that contrary to popular belief, competition is not always the answer to improving the quality. Instead of media competing to break different stories: “It seems to be the pack all following the same bone.”

He also investigates how, while a lot has been written about the decline of journalism itself, little attention is paid to making constructive attempts to find alternative structures journalists can work in to improve the quality and range of reported news.

Dr Ellis returns to the University of Auckland in 2015 to teach a Summer School course on Propaganda.

Trust_Ownership_and_the_Future_of_News_2.pdf

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review And Rap Beefs: Tame Impala, Currents.

Tame Impala’s new album Currents has one of the hallmarks of an enduring album. At first listen it seems like good, if somewhat ordinary, pop but as you go back more and more layers unravel revealing deeply rich, expertly crafted songs. More>>

Flagging Enthusiasm: Gareth Morgan Announces Winner Of $20k Flag Competition

The winner of the Morgan Foundation’s $20,000 flag competition is “Wā kāinga / Home”, designed by Auckland based Studio Alexander. Economist and philanthropist Gareth Morgan set up the competition because he had strong views on what the flag should represent but he couldn’t draw one himself. More>>

ALSO:

Books: The Lawson Quins Tell Their Incredible Story

They could have been any family of six children – except that five of them were born at once. It will come as a shock to many older New Zealanders to realise that Saturday July 25 is the Lawson quintuplets’ 50th birthday. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Wartime Women

Coinciding as it does with the movie Imitation Game which focusses on Alan Turing breaking the Enigma code in Hut 6 at Bletchley Park (“BP”), this book is likely to attract a wide readership. It deserves to do so, as it illustrates that BP was very much more than Turing and his colleagues. More>>

Maori Language Commission: Te Wiki O Te Reo Māori 2015

The theme for Māori Language Week 27 July – 2 August 2015 is ‘Whāngaihia te Reo ki ngā Mātua’ ‘Nurture the language in parents’. It aims to encourage and support every day Māori language use for parents and caregivers with children” says Acting Chief Executive Tuehu Harris.. More>>

ALSO:

Live Music: Earl Sweatshirt Plays To Sold Out Bodega

The hyped sell-out crowd had already packed themselves as close as they could get to the stage before Earl came on. The smell of weed, sweat and beer filled Bodega – more debauched sauna than bar by this point. When he arrived on stage the screaming ... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news