Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Teachers Choose Kids’ Outcomes Over More Income

Media Release 21 August 2014

Attention: Education & Political Reporters

For immediate release

Teachers Choose Kids’ Outcomes Over More Income

The Government’s $359m IES policy was scuttled by New Zealand’s primary teaching profession today when over seventy percent voted not to enter formal bargaining to vary the relevant Collective Agreements.

‘Teachers and principals have been debating this policy all year,’ said Philip Harding, President of the New Zealand Principals’ Federation.

‘We have brought in overseas experts to share their views on it, we have consulted with our own New Zealand academic community, and principals from across the country have met together to debate its pros and cons,’ he said.

‘We all support the Government’s goal to raise student achievement and the best way to do that is to invest the money in programmes and initiatives that make a difference for all kids, and not in a few teachers’ and principals’ pay packets’, he said.

‘Had the sector been invited to co-construct the policy from the start it would have been shaped very differently, and could have relied on the wisdom and experience of the profession to recommend the very best solutions to raise children’s achievement in a New Zealand context, with all its diversity, social and economic challenges,’ said Harding.

‘There are initiatives in place that we know make a difference. These just need further investment to reach more kids,’ said Harding.

There are some aspects embedded within the policy which the sector supports. These include encouraging more teacher and principal collaboration, sharing good practice, and investing more in professional learning.

‘The public must ask why teaching professionals have turned their back on an opportunity to increase their own salaries,’ said Harding. ‘It’s because the profession is more focused on supporting initiatives that can work for all children, than simply feathering their own nests.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Werewolf: Music Criticism As A Dating Metaphor

Music criticism can be just another form of consumer advic... Yet ever since pop music criticism first entered the media mainstream it has played a wider role, too. Rather than a decree with a numerical score attached, this kind of criticism functions more like travel notes. A conversation, even a form of seduction. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news