Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search


Prime Minister to Attend Launch of Te Toka Trade Training

Media release: Thursday 28 August 2014

Te Toka Trades Training Programme To Build Region’s Workforce

Building a solid foundation for the future of the Tairawhiti is the driving force behind a cross-sector initiative to be launched tomorrow in Gisborne.

Te Toka Maori and Pasifika Trades Training Programme is the result of a collaboration between Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou, EIT Tairawhiti and Lincoln University. The three groups formed a consortium and were recently selected by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and the Tertiary Education Commission to support more Maori and Pasifika students, aged 18-34, to obtain trades apprenticeships and qualifications.

The Te Toka consortium will work alongside local businesses and organisations to achieve their common goals of skilled and sustainable employment for the region. The programme will focus on developing the workforce of industries identified as economically significant to the Tairawhiti, including, forestry , agriculture, horticulture and hospitality.

Prime Minister John Key and Minister Anne Tolley will be among those joining the Te Toka trainees at the official launch to be held at EIT Tairawhiti campus. During the students’ engagement with the programme they will be provided with academic and pastoral care support, with a strong emphasis on growing professional leadership skills.

Allan Jensen, Chief Financial Officer for Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou and Chairperson of the Te Toka Governance Committee said the programme provides an important opportunity to transform the community’s economic prospects.

“Te Toka will help create training and career opportunities for our young people, so they don’t have to leave the region to find employment. Investing in our future workforce is crucial if our industries are to be successful and our infrastructure assets are to be developed.”

Mr Jensen describes the main point of difference with Te Toka in comparison to similar programmes is the scheme’s collective ethos. “Everyone involved in Te Toka –the trainees, the course tutors, the consortium members and the business community are all on the same team striving to achieve the same goals and objectives. Each member of “Team Toka” has a valuable role to play, and together we can build a better future for our whanau, for our community and for our nation.”


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


New Zealand Geographic: Photographer Of The Year Announced

Shaun Jeffers, has won the Landscape category at the New Zealand Geographic, Photographer of the Year awards for his stunning shot of the glowworms at the Waitomo Glowworm Caves! More>>


Howard Davis: Review - 'I, Daniel Blake' - Ken Loach's Bleak Masterpiece

'I, Daniel Blake' is a bleak masterpiece, a chilling and moving story of two people striking up an unlikely friendship under extremely adverse circumstances. It is both a polemical indictment of a faceless benefits bureaucracy that strips claimants of their humanity by reducing them to mere numbers, and a celebration of the decency and compassion of ordinary people who look out for one another when the state has abandoned them. More>>

Howard Davis: Review - A Girl Named Mo

Moana Ete brought her three-piece band A Girl Named Mo to Wellington's intimate and iconic Bats Theatre last week for a five-night residency. Each show was recorded and filmed live for the release of her debut album 'Platonic/Romantic' on Loop records later this year. More>>

For The Birds: Who Will Be Crowned Bird Of The Year?

The competition involves well-known and enthusiastic New Zealanders acting as ‘campaign managers’ for their favourite birds with many going to great lengths to get New Zealanders to vote for their chosen bird... More>>


  • Greening the Red Zone - Bird of the year heats up: kōtare concedes, backs kea
  • Image Out-Link - Giselle Clarkson on Twitter
  • Gordon Campbell: On Bob Dylan's Nobel (And The Surplus)

    So Bob Dylan has just won the Nobel Prize for… Literature? Wow. I’d be just as happy if he’d won for his work on particle physics (“One Grain of Sand”, “Simple Twist of Fate”) or got the Economics prize for his work on the theory of contracting (“Don’t Think Twice Its Alright”) ... More>>


    Scoop Review Of Books: Whose Goat Was That?

    Mysterious Mysteries of Aro Valley is a sharp, satirical and sometimes downright scary romp through and around that valley in ways that made me question the realities of the places I thought I knew so well. More>>


    Get More From Scoop



    Search Scoop  
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news