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UC Music and Classics move to Arts Centre

Generous alumnus helps UC Music and Classics move to Arts Centre

The University of Canterbury has received a substantial donation to support the relocation of Music Performance and Classics programmes, along with the James Logie Memorial Collection of classical antiquities, to the Arts Centre in central Christchurch.

The old Chemistry building near the corner of Hereford Street and Rolleston Avenue is currently being transformed into a purpose-built space over four floors for the University of Canterbury (UC).

UC alumnus Professor David Teece and his wife, Leigh Teece, donated funds to support the refurbishment of the old Chemistry Building, part of which will house the James Logie Memorial Collection of classical antiquities.

A portion of the funds will be held in an endowment for the conservation of the Collection’s antiquities as well as the purchase of further pieces.

In recognition of the Teece family’s generous donation, UC Vice-Chancellor Dr Rod Carr has confirmed the University will name the museum in their honour.

“The museum that houses the James Logie Memorial Collection of classical antiquities will be officially named the Teece Museum of Classical Antiquities at the University of Canterbury,” Dr Carr says.

Based in Berkeley, California, Prof Teece studied economics at what is now the Arts Centre site when it was the University’s campus and he recognises the historic link between UC and central Christchurch.

“We are pleased to share in the University’s strong future and to help restore a treasured part of Christchurch. We especially look forward to seeing vibrant student life return to the central city’s artistic heart when Music Performance and Classics programmes return to the Arts Centre,” Prof Teece says.

“We are thrilled that soon more people will be able to view and appreciate the University’s James Logie Collection of Greek and Roman artefacts when it is on display at the UC Museum in the Arts Centre.”

The move to the Arts Centre also means there will be greater performance opportunities for UC Music students. As well as dedicated spaces for public recitals, larger concerts may be held in the nearby Great Hall.

Dr Carr explains that locating the University’s Music Performance and Classics programmes at the Arts Centre will lead to more effective engagement with Christchurch’s wider arts community.

“In particular, the Classics and Music departments will have an ideal environment for greater collaboration with the Arts Centre, Canterbury Museum, galleries, music centres, theatres, and other key parts of the Christchurch cultural and educational community.”

UC will start teaching Music Performance and Classics programmes at the Arts Centre in 2017.

The Teeces have also agreed to fund the restoration of the Townsend Telescope at the same site.

ends


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