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Te Reo Māori Partnership Extended

Te Reo Māori Partnership Extended
- Building Excellence in Te Reo Research

Ko te haukai a te kairangahau Māori ko te reo Māori
Tāia, whakapuakina, whakatōkia kia puawai

The Māori language is the food of Māori researchers
Let it be written, spoken and implanted so that it will grow.

Applications have been called for the new ‘Tohu Puiaki - Doctoral Completion Scholarships’ which will offer up to $20,000 each to six people completing doctorates either in English on Māori Language Revitalisation, or, who are writing their thesis in Te Reo Māori on any subject.

As well as these ‘Tohu Puiaki - Doctoral Completion Scholarships’, applications have also just been opened for a further six of our succesful ‘Kia Ita’ Masters Scholarships.

Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori and Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga support both of these scholarships to encourage research into te reo Māori and build further research capacity amongst our communities.

The ten ‘Kia Ita’ scholarships awarded over the past 18 months have already demonstrated that they can successfully contribute to the potential of whānau, hapū, iwi and communities to develop and implement language plans to support revitalisation and produce research of significance for Aotearoa.

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Co-Director Associate Professor Tracey McIntosh says; “Te reo me ngā tikanga Māori is central to our research, our activities and communities, and we are very pleased with the outcomes of our ongoing partnership with Te Taura Whiri and the further opportunities it provides. Through these Master’s and Doctoral scholarships both NPM and TTW are not only demonstrating their ongoing commitment to te reo Māori development and advancement, but also supporting research of the highest standard.”

Te Taura Whiri Chief Executive Ngahiwi Apanui says; “The scholarship recipients’ hard work contributes to the government’s commitment, clearly articulated in the new Māori Language Act 2016, to work in partnership with iwi and Māori to continue actively to protect and promote this taonga, the Māori language, for future generations”.

To view details of the 2017 ‘Kia Ita’ and ‘Tohu Puiaki’ Scholarships and to submit your application please visit Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga’s website:
http://maramatanga.ac.nz/npm-grants

Applications close 28 February 2017.

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) is a Centre of Research Excellence hosted at the University of Auckland comprising 21 research partners and conducting research of relevance to Māori communities. Our vision is Māori leading New Zealand into the future. NPM research realises Māori aspirations for positive engagement in national life, enhances our excellence in Indigenous scholarship and provides solutions to major challenges facing humanity in local and global settings. Visit www.maramatanga.ac.nz

Te Taura Whiri I te Reo Māori was set up in 1987 to promote the use of Māori as a living language and as an ordinary means of communication. Under the Māori Language Act 2016 we will lead in the implementation of the Crown’s Māori language strategy to support the work of the new statutory organisation Te Mātāwai in leading Māori, hapū and iwi in successful revitalisation of te reo Māori. Visit www.tetaurawhiri.govt.nz

ENDS


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