Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


PM scholarship boosts Māori and Latin American links

Thursday, January 5, 2017

PM scholarship boosts Māori and Latin American links

Sharing and comparing experiences of colonialism, indigenous language revitalisation and art will be the focus for a group of New Zealand and Colombian students and academics, thanks to a Prime Minister’s Scholarship.

A group of Massey University students will forge links with indigenous students of Colombia later this year when they showcase innovative Te Reo Māori language learning methods as well as knowledge about the Treaty of Waitangi and its role in New Zealand’s history.

The $54,000 scholarship was one of two group and 12 individual scholarships to Latin America announced last month.

A group of 12 students, yet to be selected, will attend a university in the Colombian city of Medellin, in a new partnership that reflects the increasing cultural, linguistic and economic ties between New Zealand and Colombia, says Dr Leonel Alvarado. He led the scholarship application and heads Massey’s Spanish Language Programme in the School of Humanities.

The Massey project, funded by the scholarship and titled LatinoAotearoa: Spreading the Word Across the Pacific, will see four students each from Spanish language, Māori Studies (Te Reo Māori) and Māori Visual Arts programmes travelling in October to the Universidad de Antioquia. They will first do a Special Topic in Semester Two, exploring cross-cultural links between Spanish, English and Māori languages and cultures as well indigenous languages and cultures of Latin America.

Indigenous people, or pueblos indigenas, of Colombia comprise 3.4 per cent of the country’s 46 million population and belong to more than 87 tribes.

Dr Alvarado and Mr Morris will present to Colombian indigenous students and teachers their inventive language teaching methods in both Spanish and Te Reo Māori, which they have developed at Massey University. The Spanish language programme is also taught in Australia.

As well as learning about language teaching approaches, Dr Alvarado says the Colombian students will be interested to learn about aspects of New Zealand’s indigenous cultural life, including the role of the Treaty of Waitangi, the revitalisation of Te Reo Māori, the existence of a Māori political party and television channel. “These things just don’t exist in Latin American indigenous cultures,” he says.

As part of the project, Māori visual arts students will design and create an artwork to be installed at the Colombian university’s campus.

It is hoped the project will become a biennial study tour with students and staff from Universidad de Antioquia coming to Massey in alternating years.

For New Zealand students, it will be a chance to be cultural ambassadors as well as “an invaluable opportunity to work and interact with their Colombian peers and develop collaborative projects that foster cultural understanding, connections and lifelong friendships,” Dr Alvarado says.

Both countries share many commonalities, including a complex colonial history, a rich indigenous culture, vibrant and socially engaged art, a concern for environmental issues and an interest in developing local, national and global citizenship opportunities, he says.

Dr Alvarado will team up with Hone Morris, the Academic Coordinator of Massey’s Te Aho Paerewa programme (Postgraduate Diploma of Teaching and Learning in Māori Medium), as well as Israel Birch, Lecturer in Toioho ki Āpiti (Bachelor of Māori Visual Arts) under the College of Creative Arts in bringing the project to fruition. Tim Croft, International Manager at Massey’s College of Creative Arts in Wellington, was also instrumental in preparing a successful proposal, says Dr Alvarado.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Sheep: Shearing Record Smashed In Hawke’s Bay

Three shearers gathered from around New Zealand have smashed a World record by 264 sheep despite the heat, the pumiced sheep of inland Hawke’s Bay and a year’s wool weighing an average of over 3.5kg a sheep. More>>

ALSO:

Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    ALSO:

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Review: The NZSO Performs Handel's Messiah

    Max Rashbrooke: Saturday night's performance took the piece back to something like the way it would have originally been performed when premiered in 1742, with an orchestra of 20-30 players and only a few more singers. More>>

    Culture: Rare Hundertwasser Conservation Posters Found After 40 Years

    When Jan and Arnold Heine put a roll of conservation posters into storage in 1974 they had no idea that 42 years later they would be collectors items. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Education
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news