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New Zealand students excel on the international stage

New Zealand students excel on the international stage with Cambridge awards

Cambridge exams increasingly popular in New Zealand as on-screen versions are introduced to classrooms

New Zealand, 16 February 2017: Cambridge International Examinations is delighted to announce the winners of the Outstanding Cambridge Learner Awards 2017, New Zealand. The awards celebrate the outstanding academic achievements of secondary school learners in the June and November 2016 Cambridge examination series.

121 learners received awards for exceptional performance in Cambridge examinations, including 26 outstanding learners who attained “Top in the World”. In addition, New Zealand learners were awarded 64 “Top in New Zealand” awards and 46 “High Achievement” awards. In total, 139 awards were achieved across 92 Cambridge IGCSE and Cambridge International A Level syllabuses.

Three learners also received awards for achieving first place in ‘Best Across Five Cambridge IGCSEs’, ‘Best Across Four Cambridge International AS Levels’ and ‘Best Across Three Cambridge International A Levels’.

The award-winning learners have out-performed thousands of candidates worldwide who sat for the Cambridge IGCSEs and Cambridge International AS & A Levels in June and November 2016. Their outstanding results will be recognised by employers and universities around the world as proof of academic excellence, depth of learning and the attainment of higher level learning skills.

The awards were presented at the Outstanding Cambridge Learner Award ceremony on Wednesday 15 February 2017. Roger Franklin-Smith, Cambridge’s Senior Manager, New Zealand, Australia and the Pacific Islands, said: “I am very proud to congratulate our learners on their outstanding results in the Cambridge examinations and to celebrate their hard-work and talents together with their teachers, families and friends at this event. These achievements are a testimony to the unstinting dedication of our Cambridge teachers in providing the best learning support and guidance to our learners.”

“As our learners step into the next stage of their lives, their Cambridge qualifications, recognised internationally by the world’s best universities, will open up endless opportunities for them. I wish them every success in their future.”

10,000 New Zealand students to benefit from Cambridge curriculum innovations

More than 10,000 New Zealand students sit Cambridge exams every year. They all study core academic subjects such as maths, English, sciences, economics, history and modern foreign languages, but increasing numbers also take advantage of a wide range of innovative curriculum choices. This year, New Zealand students gained top scores among their peers from Cambridge schools worldwide in subjects that included Environmental Management, Marine Science, Media Studies, and Thinking Skills. Four students achieved ‘Top in the World’ awards in Cambridge’s ground-breaking Global Perspectives course that stretches across traditional subject boundaries and develops transferable skills.

Following the huge success of Cambridge IGCSE and International A & AS Level Global Perspectives, this subject will also become available to students in the lower school years - Cambridge Primary and Cambridge Secondary 1. Cambridge began piloting these courses last year in 37 schools around the world.

From 2018, New Zealand students will be able to gain a Cambridge International AS & A Level qualification in Digital Media & Design. This new subject complements the more than 55 subjects they can already choose from.

Cambridge introduces on-screen assessment for New Zealand schools

During a visit to Auckland on 15 February 2017, Michael O’Sullivan, Chief Executive of Cambridge International Examinations, announced the introduction of on-screen tests for Cambridge schools in New Zealand. This year, middle school students will have the option to take their Cambridge Secondary 1 Checkpoint tests on screen. From September 2017 Cambridge will begin to roll out on-screen tests that support teaching and learning in the classroom for Cambridge IGCSE. This will be followed by Cambridge International A Level in 2019.

For schools and indeed for exam boards, digital examinations offer both exciting and challenging perspectives. It is now possible to imagine a future in which assessment is 100 per cent digital, an idea which Cambridge is already testing. Michael O’Sullivan said:

“We are using technology to introduce new ways of assessing students such as on-screen tests. Our approach to innovation in this area is to make sure what we do is led by good practice and feedback from schools, rather than just what is technologically possible. So on-screen assessment from Cambridge will be introduced over a number of years, and will involve trialling to make sure we meet the needs of students and teachers.”

Paper-based versions of all assessments will remain. The on-screen assessments will be available as optional alternatives to paper-based assessment so that schools can select the assessment that is most appropriate for their students.

Notes to Editors:

About Cambridge International Examinations

Cambridge International Examinations is part of the University of Cambridge. We prepare school students for life, helping them develop an informed curiosity and a lasting passion for learning.

Our international qualifications are recognised by the world’s best universities and employers, giving students a wide range of options in their education and career. As a not-for-profit organisation, we devote our resources to delivering high-quality educational programmes that can unlock learners’ potential.

Learn more! Visit www.cie.org.uk


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