Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Closing courses would turn off tap of Kiwi talent

Closing internationally recognised courses would turn off tap of Kiwi talent


Plans announced by University of Otago management this week to shut down New Zealand’s only comprehensive bachelors to doctorate degree qualification in clothing and textiles science would severely undermine a valuable sector that draws world class talent to Otago, the Tertiary Education Union said.

Learning and research opportunities at the Centre of Materials Science and Technology attract students from all over New Zealand and other parts of the world. Graduates of the Centre are employed in a wide range of jobs, with many snapped up by employers for jobs before they have even completed their studies, such is the Centre’s reputation. Postgraduate enrolments have also increased steadily over the last 5 years in parallel with ongoing curriculum developments.

Management is allowing only two weeks for staff, industry and the local community to provide feedback on the Centre’s closure. It is unrealistic to expect all affected stakeholders to have their say in this short timeframe, including all those businesses and public sector organisations that may no longer be able to employ New Zealand educated graduates.

Kris Smith, an organiser of the TEU’s branch at the University of Otago, said: “The loss of these internationally recognised learning opportunities would be a disaster. No longer would future generations with an interest in the science and cultural impact of fibres, textiles and clothing look to the University of Otago as the path towards a fulfilling career in a wide range of sectors. New Zealand would also lose research capabilities in these hugely important fields.

“Management cannot possibly expect to speak to all affected stakeholders in the two weeks it is allowing for feedback. They would be wise to extend the consultation period to allow enough time for staff and industry to get around the table to work out a plan for the Centre’s future. Perhaps then management will hear just how important these qualifications are to New Zealand.”

--ENDS--

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis Review: Reclaiming The N-Word - Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman

Black resistance to institutional racism in the US has a long, tangled, and traumatic intellectual history. Although we may have assumed much too easily that white supremacists like David Duke had become marginalised as a political force, in reality they never really disappeared ... More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Minstrel in The Gallery - Sam Hunt's Selected Poems

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Sam Hunt's poetry is its quality of urgent authenticity. Encountering this latest compilation, the reader is immediately struck by its easy accessibility, tonal sincerity, and lack of linguistic pretension ... More>>

A Matter Of Fact: Truth In A Post-Truth World

How do we convincingly explain the difference between good information and misinformation? And conversely, how do we challenge our own pre-conceived notions of what we believe to be true? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: The Road To Unfreedom

Valerie Morse: Yale professor of history Tim Snyder publishes a stunning account of the mechanisms of contemporary Russian power in US and European politics. In telling this story he presents both startling alarms for our own society and some mechanisms of resistance. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland