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Scholarships doubled to help NZs primary sectors grow

Scholarships doubled to help New Zealand’s primary sectors grow

Geneticists, robotics engineers, farm managers, entrepreneurs, foresters…Students wanting to use their talents to help New Zealand grow, can now search an extensive online database of scholarships to help fund their future study or training.

The database, originally developed in 2016 by GrowingNZ – the Primary Industry Capability Alliance (PICA) – has recently been relaunched at www.growingnz.org.nz/scholarships
“By adding additional scholarships and including internships, cadetships and apprenticeships relating to New Zealand’s primary sectors, we’ve doubled the number of scholarships featured to 270 - worth over $3million,” says Dr Michelle Glogau, CEO of GrowingNZ.

New search functionality helps potential applicants narrow down the scholarships of most interest or relevance to them. The range of filters includes region, study or training level, tertiary institution, and subject area. A number of scholarships are exclusively available for: Maori; Pacifica Peoples; Asian; and rural students.

As an industry, education and government alliance, GrowingNZ is on a mission to attract 50,000 more people needed by New Zealand’s primary sectors by 2025.

“We don't just need a lot more people. We need more people who are better qualified and with a diverse range of skills for our primary sectors to thrive,” Dr Glogau explains.

“We appreciate that finding the funds for study or training is no mean feat for young people or anyone looking at changing careers,” she adds. “Making it easier for people to find out about scholarships they might be eligible for is one way we can support them.”

While many students will be eligible for ‘fees-free’ in their first year of study, many scholarships featured by GrowingNZ, offer financial support towards other costs such as books and accommodation, or for fees beyond the first year. Scholarships for apprenticeships and cadetships are also available.

Dr Glogau is quick to point out that the scholarships provide successful applicants with more than just money. “Many scholarships offer intangible benefits such as support via mentoring; networking opportunities with industry leaders; and internships. Our experience shows that after graduating, scholars are highly likely to pursue careers in our primary sectors. Ultimately, they contribute to our success so it’s a win-win.”

To find out more: www.growingnz.org.nz/scholarships Note: Eligibility and closing dates vary.

GrowingNZ provides students, career changers and influencers such as teachers, career advisors and parents with information, activities and resources to support the many career opportunities available in New Zealand’s primary sectors. It is a not-for-profit incorporated society funded by its members.
ENDS

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