Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Budget puts big challenges in secondary education aside

Not pouring the foundations yet: Budget 2018 leaves the big challenges in secondary education for later

Secondary teachers see Budget 2018 more as doing the surveying and marking out the site rather than laying foundations for the much needed improvements in the sector.

PPTA president Jack Boyle says, “Education, health and housing are the bedrock of our society. We have to get it right.”

“It’s great the government is planning for future roll growth but we were hoping for more action to fix the twin crisis of declining numbers of teacher graduates and high levels of attrition in the profession.”

“We want to bring out the best in every young person and that’s getting harder and harder. It’s passionate, expert teachers working with students that lays the groundwork for a strong society, and at the moment we simply can’t attract enough people willing and able to take on this role.”

This Budget has no new funding for the critical issue facing secondary schools, which Jack says is a “missed opportunity”.

The extra funding for special education and the operations grant is welcomed by PPTA. “The need for support for special education is clear, and we welcome anything that will enable more students to get the support to thrive at school,” said Jack.

“We’re also pleased to see a start being made on the updating and reintroduction of Te Kotahitanga. On the other hand, it’s a real disappointment that secondary teachers won’t have access to Te Ahu o te reo Māori for strengthening te reo capacity. Secondary teachers are hugely keen to have this support, and language development should be available to students of all ages.”

“We believe the government had an opportunity today to invest much, much more into our public services. Putting artificial fiscal constraints on this spending is a false economy. A well-resourced education system is vital to the nation.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Ockhams: Pip Adam Wins Premier Book Award

A novel which judges say ‘will bring readers back from the dead’ has won the 2018 $50,000 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize in the country’s premier book awards. More>>

ALSO:

Voyager Award Winner: “Sempy’s Xmas”

Congratulations to Kent Blechynden, who won a Voyager Media Award for this photo essay, published on Scoop in December.

Michael “Semp” Semple is an old school punk rocker from New Plymouth who is on the methadone programme... On Christmas day he thought he would be alone but two of his mates, “Mikey” and “Stacey”, turned up for some banter. More>>

ALSO:

Auckland & Christchurch: Bob Dylan Returns To NZ

The cross-generational icon will take in Auckland’s Spark Arena on Sunday 26th August and Christchurch’s Horncastle Arena on Tuesday 28th August. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Who Killed Jane?

This is an important book. Why? Because any publication that soberly and sensibly attempts to cast light on an unsolved murder is important, for the very real reasons that not only do the bereaved require and deserve a sense of closure, but that the murderer or murderers may be closer to being confirmed, arrested, tried. More>>

Comedy Fest: A Tasty Programme

2018 NZ INTERNATIONAL 26 APRIL – 20 MAY This April and May the 2018 NZ International Comedy Festival with Best Foods Mayo, hits Auckland and Wellington with one of the tastiest comedy line-ups of its 26-year-old history!... More>>

ALSO:

Max Rashbrooke Review: Ravishing Berlioz And Ravel

In this engaging, French-inflected performance, full of strengths, perhaps the standout was the mezzo soprano Sasha Cooke. Wellington has been visited by a few high profile singers recently, notably Anne Sofie von Otter, but few have impressed me as much ... More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland