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Ministry of Education: Statement on bargaining

Statement on bargaining
Source: Ministry of Education
--
To be attributed to Ellen MacGregor-Reid, Deputy Secretary Early Learning and Student Achievement

"We are disappointed NZEI members have rejected our offers.

"The offer sees trained teachers’ base salaries increase between 6.1 -14.7 per cent over three years which would see the beginner teacher rate increase to $50,280 a year, rising to $55,030 in 2020.

"The offer would also see increases for principals of between 6-11 per cent which would see the starting base remuneration of a principal of a school of 50 or fewer students increase to $92,873 in 2020.

"The Ministry’s negotiations with NZEI will continue over the coming weeks.
"We are disappointed escalated strike action is being discussed while negotiations are ongoing."

Background information:
The Ministry’s current offer to primary principals and teachers (as at July 3, 2018)
Teachers:
-Across the whole of the base scale for trained teachers, the increase to rates range between 6.1 -14.7 per cent.
-To attract new teachers the offer will see a cumulative increase of 14.7 percent for graduates with a teaching degree ($47,980 to $55,030) over three years and a 14.2 percent cumulative increase for graduates with a subject degree and graduate teaching diploma ($49,588 to $56,638) over three years.
-It means the beginner teacher rate increases to $50,280 a year, rising to $55,030 in 2020.
-The base salary rates for teachers (steps 1-7) will increase by $2,300 in year one, $2,350 in year two and $2,400 in year three. That’s a cumulative increase of 13.8 per cent over three years.
-The base salary rate for teachers (steps 8-12) will increase by $1,500 in year one, $1,550 in year two and $1,600 in year three. That’s a cumulative increase of 6.5 per cent over three years.
-The base salary rate for untrained teachers will increase by $1,200 in year one, $1,250 in year two, and $1,300 in year three.
-The offer also sees the merging of steps 1-4 to reflect the minimum qualification of New Zealand graduates, and an increase of classroom release time by two hours per term, from 10 hours to 12 hours.

Principals:
-The offer would see increases for principals of between 6-11 per cent.
-In schools of 150 students or fewer primary principals’ salaries would increase by between 9.5 to 11 per cent over three years.
-That would see nearly 40 per cent of primary principals receive an additional $6,000 over three years and mean by mid-2020 the starting base remuneration for a principal of a school with 50 students or fewer would be $92,873.
-Principals of schools with 150-675 students would receive an increase of between 6.6 and 7.6 per cent over three years, and principals of schools with 676 pupils or more students, would receive an increase of between 6 and 6.3 per cent over three years.
-We would also make the pay system more transparent and easier to understand by rolling some payments (like base leadership payment and career payments) into one scale.
Further information
-Over the past 10 years, teacher remuneration has grown more quickly than salary and wage rates for the workforce as a whole.
-Since 2007 average primary teacher remuneration has increased by 30.6 percent to $72,900. Over the same period the labour cost index, which tracks changes in salary and wage rates, has increased by 22.4 per cent. Over the same 10 year period inflation has increased by 21.4 per cent.
-Average primary teacher remuneration (base salary, plus allowances) is $72,900.
-38% of primary teachers (12,737) are paid above the top of the base scale (i.e. $75,949.
-Primary principals’ average core remuneration ranges from $98,360 to $165,339. The amount is largely dependent on the size of the school. With the Secretary’s approval, boards are able to pay primary principals an additional $16,311 to $25,871 for taking on extra responsibilities.
-Secondary principals' average core remuneration ranges from $104,015 to $216,654. The amount is largely dependent on the size of the school. With the Secretary’s approval, boards are able to pay secondary principals an additional $16,168 to $31,345 for taking on extra responsibilities.
-The average remuneration is $123,400 for primary and $157,300 for secondary principals.
Retention Numbers
Retention rates
YearPrincipalsTeachers
2014 95.0% 91.8%
2015 95.0% 92.9%
2016 95.4% 93.0%
2017 95.4% 93.8%
# May data 2014-2017

Teacher Supply
Budget 2018 includes $20m over four years to help increase teacher supply.
To increase teacher supply we have:
-Funded more than 850 teacher education refresher places to remove cost barriers so that teachers can return to teaching faster. 195 of these have been taken up through Auckland Uni Services with 89 being secondary teachers and 106 primary teachers.
-Made up to 200 overseas relocation grants available making it easier for New Zealand teachers to return home and encouraging more overseas teachers to relocate to work in New Zealand. At least 94 of these grants are for teachers taking roles in Auckland schools; 60 into primary and 34 into secondary.
-Expanded the Auckland Beginner Teachers programme to 60 places in 2018.
-Increased the number of new teachers training through Teach First NZ to 80 in 2018.
-Expanded the Voluntary Bonding Scheme to encourage new teachers to work in decile 2 and 3 Auckland schools, and nationwide in identified subjects.
Budget 2018
Principals and teachers have told us that they also want us to invest in other parts of the education system like children with learning needs, and school property.
Budget 2018 has provided additional funding in a number of those areas including;
-$272 million for learning support.
-$59 million for teacher aides.
-$394 million for new schools and classrooms.
ENDS

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