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Ministry presents NZEI with new offer

Ministry presents NZEI with new offer

Source: Ministry of Education

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"The Ministry of Education has presented NZEI with a new offer which would see the Principal of a school of fewer than 50 students increase their roll-based salary component from $81,553 to $92,976 by 2020. In addition, they receive a $2,320 leadership payment.

Teachers at the top of the scale would earn $82,992 a year by 2020.

50% of teachers also receive at least one unit, a $4,000 additional payment on top of their salary rates in recognition of management, leadership and other responsibilities.

New teachers who currently start on $47,980 will increase to $50,902 from mid next year increasing to $52,429 in 2020.

The new offer for teachers responds to the union’s concerns the first offer was too heavily weighted towards new teachers and increases the quantum.

Principals will receive a cumulative increase of between 9.3 and 14 percent over the next three years. That is made up of increases of between 3 and 4.5 percent each year over the next three years to the roll based component of their salary.

It provides a cumulative increase of 9.3 percent over three years; to teachers a 3 percent increase for all teachers each year, over the next three years.

The first increase will take effect when the collective agreement is settled, the second increase 12 months later and the third 24 months later.

The cost of the Ministry’s offer for teachers and Principals is $569 million over four years."

Please attribute to Iona Holsted

Secretary of Education

Please see the attached fact sheet for more information on the offer.

ENDS

PRIMARY PRINCIPALS AND TEACHERS COLLECTIVE

AGREEMENT BARGAINING FACT SHEET

(As at 11 September 2018)

Teachers

What are the salary increases?

• Teachers will receive a 3 percent pay increase to their base salaries each year for the next three years. That’s a cumulative increase of 9.3 percent over three years.

• New teachers who currently start on $47,980 will receive $49,419. That will increase to $50,902 next year and $52,429 in 2020.

• A mid-grade teacher who is currently on $59,621 will receive $61,410. That will increase to $63,252 next year and $65,149 in 2020.

• At the top end of the scale, teachers on step 12 who currently receive $75,949 will receive $78,227. That will increase to $80,574 next year and $82,992 in 2020.

• Like the initial offer, this offer sees the merging of steps 1-4 to reflect the minimum qualification of New Zealand graduates.

Note: Teachers can earn additional management/leadership payments on top of their base or roll based component salaries ($4,000 units). 38 percent of primary teachers are paid above the top of the base scale.

Principals

What are the salary increases?

• Principals will receive increases of between 3 - 4.5 percent each year, over the next three years to the roll based component of their salary. That’s a cumulative increase of between 9.3-14 percent over the next three years.

• In schools of 100 students or fewer, primary principals’ roll-based salary component will increase by 4.5 per cent in 2018 and 2019, and 4.4 per cent in 2020, a cumulative increase of 14 percent.

• A new principal of a school with 50 students or fewer would see their roll-based salary component salary increase from $81,553, to $85,223. That will increase to $89,058 next year and $92,976 in 2020.

• In schools with 101 or more students principals will receive a 3 percent pay increase to their roll based salary component each year over the next three years.

• A principal with at least nine-years’ experience leading a school of 851-1025 students will see their core remuneration (made up of the roll-based component, the base leadership payment and a career payment) increase from $135,517 to $139,216. It will then increase to $143,027 next year and $146,951 in 2020.

• We would also make the pay system more transparent and easier to understand by rolling some payments (like base leadership payment and career payments) into one scale.

What about workload?

• The offer also confirms our commitment to work together to develop an Education Workforce strategy which will look at how to attract, recruit and retain teachers.

• We are also reviewing how teachers assess learning, which teachers have told us also impacts on workload and their ability focus on teaching.

• The Government has already removed National Standards in response to teachers’ claims it was a large driver of workload

• A joint taskforce has been set up to identify the compliance-related administrative tasks that can be reduced or eliminated to free up time for principals and teachers.

• Agreement has already been reached and a well-being strategy and plans to implement it are being developed.

How does the offer address other concerns?

• Budget 2018 includes $20m over four years to help increase teacher supply, $370 million for 1500 new teacher places by 2021 to meet population growth and $59 million for teacher aides.

• The NZEI and the Ministry are currently engaged in a pay equity inquiry for teacher aides.

• NZEI also wants to see more funding for learning support. Budget 2018 has already provided more than $270 million in additional funding for learning support. On top of that Associate Education Minister Tracey Martin is developing a Disability and Learning Support Action Plan which will include a range of priority actions to identify and respond to learning needs earlier, and look at the need for additional staff.

• NZEI also wants to fully recognise teachers with te reo Māori and tikanga or working in Pacific languages, recognise expertise in special education, and curriculum specialisation. This is part of their proposal to refresh the career framework development and work programmes to address sector wide issues. The Ministry is proposing to continue joint work on a career framework.

Further information

Over the past 10 years, teacher remuneration has grown more quickly than salary and wage rates for the workforce as a whole.

Since 2007 average primary teacher remuneration (base salary plus allowances) has increased by 30.6 percent to $72,900 and average primary principal remuneration (all remuneration components) has increased by 32.1 percent to $123,400.

Over the same period the labour cost index, which tracks changes in salary and wage rates, has increased by 22.4 per cent. Over the same 10 year period inflation has increased by 21.4 per cent.

Average primary teacher remuneration (base salary, plus allowances) is $72,900.

38% of primary teachers are paid above the top of the base scale (i.e. are paid $75,949 plus allowances or units)

Primary principals’ core remuneration (made up of the roll-based component, base leadership payment and career payment) ranges from $83,873 to $141,558. The amount is largely dependent on the size of the school. With the Secretary’s approval, boards are able to pay primary principals an additional $16,311 to $25,871 for taking on extra responsibilities.

The average remuneration (all remuneration components) for primary principals is $123,400.

Cost of offer

The Ministry of Education’s offer (as at September 7 2018) is expected to cost $569 million over four years. This includes union and non-union members but does not include any changes to learning support.

Pay increases:

The increase to base salaries for primary teachers since 2007 has been:

2007 4.00%

2008 4.00%

2009 4.00%

2010 2.75%

2013 1.04%

2014 0.92%

2015 0.56%

2016 2.00%

2017 2.00%

Teacher Supply

Budget 2018 includes $20m over four years to help increase teacher supply.

To increase teacher supply we have:

• Funded more than 1000 teacher education refresher places to remove cost barriers so that teachers can return to teaching faster.

• Paid 145 overseas relocation grants making it easier for New Zealand teachers to return home and overseas trained teachers to relocate to New Zealand.

• Expanded the Auckland Beginner Teachers programme to 60 places in 2018 with another 60 places available in 2019.

• Increased the number of new teachers training through Teach First NZ to 80 in 2018 and 2019.

• Expanded the Voluntary Bonding Scheme to encourage new teachers to work in decile 2 and 3 Auckland schools, and nationwide in identified subjects and Māori Medium Kura. Around 300 teachers who started their role in 2018 will be eligible.

Budget 2018 also includes $370 million for 1500 new teaching places by 2021 to meet population growth

Learning Support:

We know that demand is increasing for learning support due a number of reasons including population growth, earlier identification of needs through early intervention services and increased participation in early childhood education. There are also more children and young people with complex, and in some cases enduring needs.

That’s why Budget 2018 provided over $270 million in over four years to fund a range of supports and services for students with additional learning needs. This includes an extra $133.5 million for the Ongoing Resourcing Scheme (ORS), which provides vital support for school students with the highest and most complex learning needs.

To ensure that children and young people get the right support at the right time we are currently implementing a new Learning Support Delivery Approach, in response to feedback from parents, whānau, disability and education sector groups. The new approach includes:

• A single plan of support for each child or young person to achieve their learning goals

• More flexibility to create support that is innovative and responsive

• Providing family and whānau with support to help navigate the system

• Better facilitation to bring together local education and service providers.

We are currently developing a Disability and Learning Support Action Plan which will include a range of priority actions to identify and respond to learning needs earlier. We will be engaging widely in the next few months on how we can make improvements in learning support.

What principals earn now:

The current core remuneration for primary principals (see table below) is made up of:

• a roll-based component, the rate depends on the U-grade or roll size of the school; and

• a leadership payment of $2,320 per annum; and

• a career payment for those principals with at least 3 years principal service (rate of the payment is $3,641 per annum for developing principals; $6,763 per annum for experienced principals; $9,884 per annum for leading principals).

School

U-grade

Roll

size

Beginning Principal <3yrsDeveloping

Principal 3yrs+

Experienced Principal

6yrs+

Leading Principal

9yrs+

U11-50$83,873$87,514$90,636$93,757
U251-100$90,465$94,106$97,228$100,349
U3101-150$97,558$101,199$104,321$107,442
U4151-300$105,021$108,662$111,784$114,905
U5301-500$112,484$116,125$119,247$122,368
U6501-675$116,749$120,390$123,512$126,633
U7676-850$121,190$124,831$127,953$131,074
U8851-1025$125,633$129,274$132,396$135,517
U91026-1200$128,654$132,295$135,417$138,538
U101201-1400$131,674$135,315$138,437$141,558

Note: The table covers U1 to U10 schools as this is the roll-range for primary schools

Principals of decile 1 to 4 schools receive a decile payment (the rate depends on the U-grade or roll size of the school). For example, for a decile 1 school with a roll size of between 51 and 100 the rate of the payment is $4,290 per annum.

What teachers earn now

StepCurrentFTTE
1$36,6923.8
2$39,5133.3
3$43,7455.4
4$47,980528.6
5$49,588962.1
6$51,5081,028
7$54,330983
8$59,6212,654.9
9$63,9291,367.3
10$68,4461,009
11$71,8917,632.4
12$75,9498,112.9
24,300.8

How many unions members are there?

As at 30 July there was a total of 33,636 primary teachers and primary principals on the payroll.

Of these:

27,155 (81%) members

6,481 (19%) non members

It is important to note though that this number changes regularly as new teachers and principals start and others change agreements.

How many students?

The 2017 July roll had 464,442 students enrolled in primary and Intermediate (excluding *composite and special)

How many schools are there in the primary sector?

There are around 1943 primary, intermediate and special schools (the school types covered by the Primary Teachers' Collective Agreement)

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