Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Bradford's Education Supermarket A Flawed Vision

"Mr Bradford may envisage people selecting their variety of qualification via a supermarket but unfortunately tertiary education is no where near that cheap." Said President of the Otago University Students' Association (OUSA), Steve Day in response to a speech Mr Bradford made today.

Tertiary Education Minister Max Bradford outlined a seriously flawed vision for the future of Tertiary Education this morning at the 23rd annual conference of Tertiary Education Management His vision involved students heading overseas and business influencing previously independent research.

"While the children of Bradford's friends in industry my be able to afford to fill their tertiary trolleys with gourmet delicacies from around the world, many people seeking tertiary education are standing in the ten-items-or-less isle with only a can of baked beans. More than likely they will be served by a check out assistant who is working while studying because they can't access a basic living allowance while studying."

"The reason students are going overseas is not, as Mr Bradford claims, cheaper transport, it is more expensive domestic fees. Our degrees now rival those in the United States for price but offer none of the scholarship support and long term belief in research." Claimed Steve Day.

Mr Bradford argues that New Zealand needs to be more business focused in its tertiary education delivery. In last month's "Bright Future" package the Government indicated its desire to move more students into the areas of science and technology. "The Government very clearly wishes to make Universities nothing more than research mills for the country's business interests.

"To fawn over the credibility of foreign tertiary institutes as Mr Bradford did today only exemplifies how much we have undermined our own institutes' credibility through under-funding." Stated OUSA Campaign Coordinator and President-Elect, Andrew Campbell.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis Article: A Musical Axis - Brahms, Wagner, Sibelius

Brahms' warm and exquisitely subtle Symphony No. 3 in F major, Wagner's irrepressibly sentimental symphonic poem Siegfried Idyll, and Sibelius' chilling and immensely challenging Violin Concerto in D minor exemplify distinct stages of development in a tangled and convoluted series of skirmishes that came to define subsequent disputes about the nature of post-Romantic orchestral writing well into the following century. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: A Pale Ghost Writer

Reviewed by Ruth Brassington, Richard Flanagan's new novel is about a novelist hastily ghost-writing the biography of a crook about to go to trial. The reader is kept on a cliff-edge, as the narrator tries to get blood out of his stone man. More>>

Negotiations Begin: Equal Conditions For Men & Women In Professional Football

The trade union representing New Zealand's professional footballers has initiated bargaining for an agreement securing equal terms and conditions for men and women. If negotiated, it will be the first agreement of its kind in the world. More>>

ALSO:


New Zealand Wars Commemoration: Witi Ihimaera's Sleeps Standing Moetū

The second of several articles to mark Rā Maumahara, remembering the New Zealand Land Wars. The first was a Q&A with Vincent O’Malley, author of The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800–2000. More>>

ALSO:


Howard Davis Review: Conflict & Resistance - Ria Hall's Rules of Engagement

From the aftermath of war through colonisation to her own personal convictions, Hall's new CD addresses current issues and social problems on multiple levels, confirming her position as a polemical and preeminent voice on the indigenous NZ music scene. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland