Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Labour supports schools' stance

Labour
2000 web siteLabour education spokesperson Trevor Mallard said schools are within their right to refuse to deliver National Party political propaganda.

Trevor Mallard was commenting on reports that many schools were refusing to deliver the Minister's pamphlet on school testing.

"Good on them. It is a leading piece of propaganda and the timing of its release so close to an election has to be seriously questioned," Trevor Mallard said.

"If Nick Smith wanted parents to receive this pamphlet he should have stamped a big blue 'N' on it and had it hand delivered by National Party volunteers in the same manner as other electioneering publications.

"In developing our education policy, Labour looked extremely closely at school assessments. We consulted widely with the teaching profession and with academic researchers on the issue and came to the conclusion that national testing was not in the best interests of children's learning.

"Instead we have opted for ensuring that schools have a clear system of reporting to parents on their children's progress measured against nationally moderated assessment banks and using carefully developed exemplars. We also propose developing a method of passing these reports onto other schools by electronic methods because the rapid mobility of many families.

"A wide range of sector groups, including the School Trustees Association - an official representative of parents, have told the Government that their policy won't work.

"To ignore all advice and then try and use schools as free delivery agents just a few weeks before an election, is nothing short of sneaky," Trevor Mallard said.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Legendary Bassist David Friesen Plays Wellington’s Newest Jazz Venue

Friesen is touring New Zealand to promote his latest album Another Time, Another Place, recorded live at Auckland's Creative Jazz Club in 2015. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>


Howard Davis Review: Blade Runner Redivivus

When Ridley Scott's innovative, neo-noir, sci-fi flick Blade Runner was originally released in 1982, at a cost of over $45 million, it was a commercial bomb. More>>

14-21 October: New Zealand Improv Festival In Wellington

Imagined curses, Shibuya’s traffic, the apocalypse, and motherhood have little in common, but all these and more serve as inspiration for the eclectic improvised offerings coming to BATS Theatre this October for the annual New Zealand Improv Festival. More>>

ALSO:

Bird Of The Year Off To A Flying Start

The competition asks New Zealanders to vote for their favourite bird in the hopes of raising awareness of the threats they face. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Jenny Abrahamson's John & Charles Enys: Castle Hill Runholders, 1864-1891

This volume will be of interest to a range of readers interested in the South Island high country, New Zealand’s natural environment, and the history of science. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION