News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Keep Millitary Ban On Indonesia - Amnesty

* News Release Issued by the International Secretariat of Amnesty International *

Indonesia

EU ban on military and security exports to Jakarta must not be lifted, for now

The European Union must not resume the sale of arms or security equipment likely to be used to commit human rights violations in Indonesia. By doing so, it will risk condemning more people to human rights abuses at the hands of a security force equipped with weapons manufactured in Europe, Amnesty International said today.

" While East Timor is now secure, similar patterns of intimidation and killing which shocked the world and prompted the EU to impose military sanctions on Indonesia are being repeated in parts of Indonesia," the human rights organisation pointed out, responding to reports that the EU is about to lift the ban on military and security exports, imposed in September 1999.

" Indonesian security forces who stand accused of crimes against humanity and war crimes in East Timor continue to be allowed to get away with murder in Indonesia. In this highly volatile period of political transition, how can the EU be confident that transfers of armoured personnel carriers, machine-guns and internal security equipment will not be used to commit human rights violations?" Amnesty International asked.

The organisation pointed out that Indonesian police personnel who joined with militia groups to attack innocent civilians in East Timor last year are now reported to be stationed in Aceh, where scores of people have been killed or have "disappeared" in recent months.

There are also allegations that elements of the Indonesian security forces have taken sides in the communal conflict between Christians and Muslims in the Moluccan islands, which has resulted in hundreds of deaths over the last year.

In West Timor, military-backed militias continue to hamper international efforts to repatriate East Timorese refugees who fled or were forcibly expelled in September 1999. Reports of threats, intimidation, killing and sexual violence by militia members are commonplace. Despite repeated calls for their disarming and disbanding, there is still militia activity in the area.

In the past, EU countries have supplied the Indonesian security forces with a range of technology, including water cannon, armoured personnel carriers, sub-machine guns, small arms and ammunition, some of which is known to have been used against civilians.

In the run-up to the East Timor ballot last year, for example, Finnish-made bullet casings were found after a militia attack in Dili, and UK Hawk aircraft were used to intimidate the East Timorese population.

"Such equipment must not be shipped to Indonesia at the present time. To do so would be grossly irresponsible and risk facilitating human rights violations, " Amnesty International said.

ENDS.../

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis Article: A Musical Axis - Brahms, Wagner, Sibelius

Brahms' warm and exquisitely subtle Symphony No. 3 in F major, Wagner's irrepressibly sentimental symphonic poem Siegfried Idyll, and Sibelius' chilling and immensely challenging Violin Concerto in D minor exemplify distinct stages of development in a tangled and convoluted series of skirmishes that came to define subsequent disputes about the nature of post-Romantic orchestral writing well into the following century. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: A Pale Ghost Writer

Reviewed by Ruth Brassington, Richard Flanagan's new novel is about a novelist hastily ghost-writing the biography of a crook about to go to trial. The reader is kept on a cliff-edge, as the narrator tries to get blood out of his stone man. More>>

Negotiations Begin: Equal Conditions For Men & Women In Professional Football

The trade union representing New Zealand's professional footballers has initiated bargaining for an agreement securing equal terms and conditions for men and women. If negotiated, it will be the first agreement of its kind in the world. More>>

ALSO:


New Zealand Wars Commemoration: Witi Ihimaera's Sleeps Standing Moetū

The second of several articles to mark Rā Maumahara, remembering the New Zealand Land Wars. The first was a Q&A with Vincent O’Malley, author of The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800–2000. More>>

ALSO:


Howard Davis Review: Conflict & Resistance - Ria Hall's Rules of Engagement

From the aftermath of war through colonisation to her own personal convictions, Hall's new CD addresses current issues and social problems on multiple levels, confirming her position as a polemical and preeminent voice on the indigenous NZ music scene. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland