News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Waitangi Issues Best Settled By "Quiet Revolution"


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 2 FEBRUARY 2000

Waitangi Issues Should Be Settled By "Quiet Revolution"

Treaty of Waitangi issues and controversies should be settled through a quiet revolution, says eminent constitutional and land law expert Professor Jock Brookfield.

"Maori claims and expectations, based on the Treaty of Waitangi or on the revived common law of aboriginal rights, remain outstanding. That, in the case of the Treaty, is despite a degree of effect given to its principles by Parliament and by courts and tribunals," he says.

In his new book, Waitangi & Indigenous Rights, Professor Brookfield makes a case for settlement of these claims that extends to basic constitutional change in New Zealand to redress wrongs that go back to the revolution begun in 1840.

What is needed, he maintains, is a "quiet revolution" by agreement between Maori and Pakeha to break with our past and develop a new written constitution protecting the Treaty, preferably as part of a New Zealand republic.

This would result from a renegotiation of the exercise of sovereignty within New Zealand. "The difficulty is that, as Professor JGA Pocock has recently commented, Maori and Pakeha 'have been renegotiating sovereignty even as it is being sold out from under them' in the process of economic globalization to which the country has submitted itself since the mid-1980s."

Some supporters of globalization policies are likely to oppose the kind of constitutional change suggested by Professor Brookfield. "They may prefer that the existing order be retained, in which such policies can be pursued free of any strong constitutional restraints protecting the Treaty of Waitangi."

Professor Brook field says the constitutional settlement he suggests would depend on the New Zealand nation-state's having the political will and power, despite any adverse economic pressures, to put the settlement into effect and to carry through the quiet revolution needed to secure it.


- ENDS -

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Electronica: Restoring The World’s First Recorded Computer Music

University of Canterbury Distinguished Professor Jack Copeland and UC alumni and composer Jason Long have restored the earliest known recording of computer-generated music, created more than 65 years ago using programming techniques devised by Alan Turing. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Almost Getting Away With Murder

The Black Widow by Lee-Anne Cartier: Lee-Anne Cartier is the sister of the Christchurch man found to have been murdered by his wife, Helen Milner, after an initial assumption by police that his death, in 2009, was suicide. More>>

Howard Davis: Triple Echo - The Malevich/Reinhardt/Hotere Nexus

Howard Davis: The current juxtaposition of works by Ralph Hotere and Ad Reinhardt at Te Papa perfectly exemplifies Jean Michel Massing's preoccupation with the transmigration of imagery in a remarkable triple echo effect... More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Nō Tāu Manawa

Vaughan Rapatahana responds to Fale Aitu | Spirit House by Tusiata Avi: "fa’afetai Tusiata, fa’afetai, / you’ve swerved & served us a masterclass corpus / through graft / of tears & fears..." More>>

9 Golds - 21 Medals: NZ Team Celebrates As Rio 2016 Paralympic Games Close

The entire New Zealand Paralympic Team, led by kiwi sprinter and double gold medallist Liam Malone as flag bearer, are on the bus to the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro for the Closing Ceremony of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games. There, they will celebrate the fantastic successes of the past 10 days. More>>

ALSO:

New Zealand Improv Festival: The Festival Of Moments To Return To The Capital

The eighth incarnation of the New Zealand Improv Festival comes to BATS Theatre this 4-8 October , with a stellar line-up of spontaneous theatre and instant comedy performed and directed by top improvisors from around New Zealand and the world. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news