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Energy Awards To Industry By Ministry Of Energy

Thames hospital wins energy award

Thames Hospital has won an Energy-Wise 2000 award for energy efficiency measures, trimming $42,000 off its energy bill last year in the process.

The award was one of eight given by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), a Government agency that promotes energy efficient practices and technologies.

The Minister of Energy, Hon. Pete Hodgson, presented Thames Hospital with the award in the commercial/service category at a ceremony in Auckland on March 23.

“Improving energy efficiency offers huge financial, environmental and social gains for relatively little cost,” says Mr Hodgson.

“New Zealand has lost its way in recent years with energy efficiency and harnessing renewable energy sources.

“However, the diversity of winners and their remarkable achievements offer very real encouragement for others to follow in their footsteps and reach similar commercial and ethical success.”

The hospital’s engineering and property manager, Bruce Harper, says financial gain was one reason for becoming energy efficient.

“Energy is a large portion of our budget, and the money we saved on energy we’ve turned back into the maintaining of the hospital.” The hospital reduced its energy costs by 15% last year.

But there are environmental reasons as well, Mr Harper says.

“Of course we’re in the green belt here, we’re energy conscious, we’re in Jeanette Fitzsimons’s patch.

“And it’s certainly a healthier and warmer work environment – that was a real plus.”

The hospital saved energy through staff awareness, keeping out draughts and closing drapes in the early evening to “lock the heat into the hospital”.

But a big saving was made by careful monitoring to avoid large peaks in electricity usage, which attract large bills.

The largest peak came from the kitchen when the stove, heating and a 28kW dishwasher were all turned on at the same time in the morning when staff arrived.

Careful scheduling of equipment usage spread the load and reduced the peak, said Mr Harper.

“Our highest demand was six o’clock [a.m.], and now that peak virtually doesn’t exist.”

EECA chief executive Godfrey Bridger says energy efficiency leads to bottom-line results, and enhances market competitiveness.

But there are a variety of other benefits besides financial rewards that flow from energy efficiency, he says.

“Reduced energy consumption means less reliance on generation from fossil fuels, and that means less carbon dioxide to contribute to global warming.”

“And organisations that show concern for the environment can also gain from increased staff commitment, greater recognition in the marketplace and improved customer loyalty.”

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Auckland University scoops Energy Manager of the Year award

Auckland University’s energy manager, Denis Agate, has been named Energy Manager of the Year for efficiency measures which have saved his employer more than $15 million in the last 20 years.

The award was one of eight given by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), a Government agency that promotes energy efficient practices and technologies.

The Minister of Energy, Hon. Pete Hodgson, presented Mr Agate with the Outstanding Energy Manager of the Year award at a ceremony in Auckland on March 23.

“Improving energy efficiency offers huge financial, environmental and social gains for relatively little cost,” says Mr Hodgson.

“New Zealand has lost its way in recent years with energy efficiency and harnessing renewable energy sources.

“However, the diversity of winners and their remarkable achievements offer very real encouragement for others to follow in their footsteps and reach similar commercial and ethical success.”

Mr Agate says his energy saving philosophy is: “if it’s not required, switch it off.”

The University has a sophisticated building management system that provides remote sensing and centralised computer control, even for their remote Tamaki campus and School of Medicine.

This enables control of heating and air conditioning in relation to outside air temperature, room occupancy and even room CO2 levels.

“It means being able to apply logic to something rather than having just a time clock going on,” Mr Agate said.

Another key factor is using resources sensibly, and for the right purpose, he says.

“Water is used quite often for cooling equipment because it’s perceived to be cheap [but] water requires pumping into a building, pumping through the mains, pumping out to a sewage station and then out to be treated.

“It ends up with an energy content in it, and is very expensive to purchase.”

All the gains so far have been made through technology, and the next step is personal responsibility, he says.

He wants to combine staff training with detailed monitoring and billing for individual areas.

The idea is that when areas meet their own energy costs they will strive for greater efficiencies, like turning off computers that aren’t being used.

“I’m dead keen to get that done, because I think we’ll see a quantum leap [in savings] at that stage.”

EECA chief executive Godfrey Bridger says energy efficiency leads to bottom-line results, and enhances market competitiveness.

But there are a variety of other benefits besides financial rewards that flow from energy efficiency, he says.

“Reduced energy consumption means less reliance on generation from fossil fuels, and that means less carbon dioxide to contribute to global warming.”

“And organisations that show concern for the environment can also gain from increased staff commitment, greater recognition in the marketplace and improved customer loyalty.”

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Colgate-Palmolive wins energy award

Lower Hutt-based Colgate Palmolive Limited has won an Energy-Wise 2000 award for energy efficiency measures, trimming $44,000 off its energy bill last year in the process.

The award was one of eight given by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), a Government agency that promotes energy efficient practices and technologies.

The Minister of Energy, Hon. Pete Hodgson, presented Colgate-Palmolive with the award in the industrial/manufacturing category at a ceremony in Auckland on March 23.

“Improving energy efficiency offers huge financial, environmental and social gains for relatively little cost,” says Mr Hodgson.

“New Zealand has lost its way in recent years with energy efficiency and harnessing renewable energy sources.

“However, the diversity of winners and their remarkable achievements offer very real encouragement for others to follow in their footsteps and reach similar commercial and ethical success.”

Colgate-Palmolive’s Engineering Manager Malcolm Nielsen says reduced energy consumption is the main benefit of energy efficiency, but not the only one.

“It reduces costs not only in the actual energy [used], but if you can reduce the operating hours the maintenance goes down accordingly.

“There’s also an ethical approach to trying to maximise efficiencies because it’s waste otherwise.

“What’s not needed is not wasted.”

Key initiatives included changes to lighting, motor drive controls and air compressors.

One large compressor operated around the clock, but a smaller unit was added to supply periods of low demand.

“Matching the machine to the load is a way to get far better efficiency out of the energy used,” Mr Nielsen said.

The company also saved $8,000 per year just by switching computers off after hours.

EECA chief executive Godfrey Bridger says energy efficiency leads to bottom-line results, and enhances market competitiveness.

But there are a variety of other benefits besides financial rewards that flow from energy efficiency, he says.

“Reduced energy consumption means less reliance on generation from fossil fuels, and that means less carbon dioxide to contribute to global warming.”

“And organisations that show concern for the environment can also gain from increased staff commitment, greater recognition in the marketplace and improved customer loyalty.”

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Coldstorage International wins energy award

Mt. Maunganui’s Coldstorage International has won an Energy-Wise 2000 award for energy efficiency measures, trimming $90,000 off its energy bill in the process.

The award was one of eight given by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), a Government agency that promotes energy efficient practices and technologies.

The Minister of Energy, Hon. Pete Hodgson, presented Coldstorage International with the award in the smaller energy user category at a ceremony in Auckland on March 23.

Wellington’s Rongotai College was a joint winner in the category.

“Improving energy efficiency offers huge financial, environmental and social gains for relatively little cost,” says Mr Hodgson.

“New Zealand has lost its way in recent years with energy efficiency and harnessing renewable energy sources.

“However, the diversity of winners and their remarkable achievements offer very real encouragement for others to follow in their footsteps and reach similar commercial and ethical success.”

Coldstorage International, a subsidiary of New Zealand Dairy Group, operates a five-and-a-half acre site on Mt. Maunganui wharf, handling kiwifruit and dairy products.

Site manager Gary Shaw says saving energy is important because it’s their single biggest cost next to wages.

“Labour is something you can’t do a lot about, and I don’t think it’s a smart place to trim down.

“Energy I believe you can [trim down] and any savings that you make are going to be off the bottom line.”

Mr Shaw says they stepped up their energy efficiency programme a year ago.

“The major benefit is a 35 per cent reduction in power.

“A $90,000 saving for 12 months is going to cost about $12,500 – it’s a very good return.

“We’ve had a large reduction in kilowatts used, which is good for the country, and it reduces wear and tear on machinery because you’re not running it as hard or as often.”

Mr Shaw says savings were made by shifting the bulk of refrigeration to night-time when electricity costs are lower, and concentrating on monitoring product temperature.

“We were monitoring our air but if our product is minus nine, who cares what the air temperature is?”

They also looked at keeping doors closed and how they pre-cooled incoming product.

EECA chief executive Godfrey Bridger says energy efficiency leads to bottom-line results, and enhances market competitiveness.

But there are a variety of other benefits besides financial rewards that flow from energy efficiency, he says.

“Reduced energy consumption means less reliance on generation from fossil fuels, and that means less carbon dioxide to contribute to global warming.”

“And organisations that show concern for the environment can also gain from increased staff commitment, greater recognition in the marketplace and improved customer loyalty.”

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Parliamentary Service wins energy award

Parliamentary Service has won an Energy-Wise 2000 award for energy efficiency measures, trimming $214,000 off its energy bill last year in the process.

The award was one of eight given by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), a Government agency that promotes energy efficient practices and technologies.

The Minister of Energy, Hon. Pete Hodgson, presented Parliamentary Service with the award in the public sector category at a ceremony in Auckland on March 23.

“Improving energy efficiency offers huge financial, environmental and social gains for relatively little cost,” says Mr Hodgson.

“New Zealand has lost its way in recent years with energy efficiency and harnessing renewable energy sources.

“However, the diversity of winners and their remarkable achievements offer very real encouragement for others to follow in their footsteps and reach similar commercial and ethical success.”

Parliamentary Service building facilities manager Peter Ritchie says the main benefits of energy efficiency are reduced costs and better performance of plant.

“If you can cut down run-time you extend the capital life of the plant.

“Plus overall, it must be a reduction on the resources [used] for New Zealand.”

One important technique used was load shedding, where equipment like air conditioners is briefly turned off when electricity usage builds to a peak, as the peaks directly influence supply charges, says Mr Ritchie.

Even the parliamentary tour went under the microscope, with tour lighting now being used only as required.

Parliamentary Service is now working on the next round of savings in a process Mr Ritchie says never ends.

“It’s ongoing and it always will be.”

EECA chief executive Godfrey Bridger says energy efficiency can work for any organisation, leading to bottom-line results and enhancing market competitiveness.

But there are a variety of other benefits besides financial rewards that flow from energy efficiency, he says.

“Reduced energy consumption means less reliance on generation from fossil fuels, and that means less carbon dioxide to contribute to global warming.

“And organisations that show concern for the environment can also gain from increased staff commitment, greater recognition in the marketplace and improved customer loyalty.”

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Rongotai College wins energy award

Wellington’s Rongotai College has won an Energy-Wise 2000 award for energy efficiency measures, trimming $9,500 off its energy bill last year in the process.

The award was one of eight given by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), a Government agency that promotes energy efficient practices and technologies.

The Minister of Energy, Hon. Pete Hodgson, presented Rongotai College with the award in the smaller energy user category at a ceremony in Auckland on March 23.

Mt. Maunganui’s Coldstorage International was a joint winner in the category.

“Improving energy efficiency offers huge financial, environmental and social gains for relatively little cost,” Mr Hodgson said.

“New Zealand has lost its way in recent years with energy efficiency and harnessing renewable energy sources.

“However, the diversity of winners and their remarkable achievements offer very real encouragement for others to follow in their footsteps and reach similar commercial and ethical success.”

Rongotai College Bursar Barry Law says the school’s approach to energy efficiency is straight forward.

“As much money as possible has got to go into teaching the kids.”

Outside consultants were used to identify potential savings, and EECA independently assessed the advice.

“It made it easier for me to go to our board of trustees and say if we spend X number of dollars these are the savings we’re going to make.”

Key initiatives included hot water cylinder wraps, additional ceiling insulation and more efficient lighting.

Changes to the boiler and heating system allow much greater control, such as heating only one side of the school while the sun warms up the other side.

“That system is where the biggest change has been.

“We can set up what is a comfortable temperature and then heat the school accordingly.”

New ideas will be assessed every year, says Mr Law.

“Energy efficiency is an ongoing process because it’s just very easy to have it go out the window, so to speak.”

EECA chief executive Godfrey Bridger says energy efficiency can work for any organisation, leading to bottom-line results and enhancing market competitiveness.

But there are a variety of other benefits besides financial rewards that flow from energy efficiency, he says.

“Reduced energy consumption means less reliance on generation from fossil fuels, and that means less carbon dioxide to contribute to global warming.

“And organisations that show concern for the environment can also gain from increased staff commitment, greater recognition in the marketplace and improved customer loyalty.”

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Buses First! wins energy award

Auckland City Buses First! project has won an Energy-Wise 2000 award for its efforts in the battle against Auckland’s traffic congestion.

The award was one of eight given by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA), a Government agency that promotes energy efficient practices and technologies.

Buses First! was initiated by Auckland City in August 1996. It is a joint venture between the Auckland City and Regional Councils, Stagecoach New Zealand, the Bus and Coach Association and the Police.

The project has made travel by bus faster and more attractive, reducing Dominion Road morning peak travel times ‘by 30%, and has encouraged people to leave their cars at home.

It has also reduced the per-traveller emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants. The benefit:cost ratio of several of the project’s initiatives is between 4:1 and 7:1.

The Minister of Energy, Hon. Pete Hodgson, presented Buses First! with the inaugural award in the transport category of the Energy-Wise awards at a ceremony in Auckland on March 23.

“Improving energy efficiency offers huge financial, environmental and social gains for relatively little cost,” Mr Hodgson said.

“New Zealand has lost its way in recent years with energy efficiency and harnessing renewable energy sources.

“However, the diversity of winners and their remarkable achievements offer very real encouragement for others to follow in their footsteps and reach similar commercial and ethical success.”

Auckland City’s principal transport planner Denis Mander says buses are a more efficient way to move people around than cars.

“Not only in terms of emissions and air quality, but also in terms of making use of the available road space.

“You require far less space to move 40 people on a bus as against 40 people in cars.”

The project has included shared bus and cycle lanes, and traffic signal pre-emptions, which switch on the green lights for buses, have been set up on several major routes. These schemes have helped reduce travel times.

The Symonds Street bus lane has been painted green to distinguish it.

Mr Mander says the Buses First! project will be expanded to incorporate more bus routes, and green asphalt will be used to make bus lanes stand out.

EECA chief executive Godfrey Bridger says energy efficiency can work for any organisation, leading to bottom-line results and enhancing market competitiveness.

But there are a variety of other benefits besides financial rewards that flow from energy efficiency, he says.

“Reduced energy consumption means less reliance on generation from fossil fuels, and that means less carbon dioxide to contribute to global warming.

ends


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