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Guidelines For Protecting Our Heritage Released

MEDIACOM-RELEASE-HISTORIC PLACES TRUST

A set of guidelines aimed at protecting heritage buildings and places was launched in Wellington today by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust.

Heritage buildings and places are `the taonga that we want to pass on to future generations', ranging from workers' cottages to national monuments.

"Too often in the past our heritage has been lost forever during renovations, alterations and development," says the Trust's Chief Executive, Elizabeth Kerr.

"The Heritage Guidelines provide essential practical and clear advice for planners, developers and owners on altering and developing heritage buildings for ongoing use", she says.

" Heritage buildings and places have a much better chance of surviving for present and future generations to enjoy if they continue to serve a useful function within the community.

"There are many very good examples around the country of the preservation of heritage buildings for public and private use - Auckland's Civic Theatre and the Old BNZ Centre in Wellington are two highly visible public examples. There are also many fine examples of privately owned buildings, including private homes, retaining their heritage features despite renovations for contemporary needs."

The set of 10 guidelines covers a range of topics, including adapting heritage buildings for changing needs, providing access for people with disabilities and providing protection from earthquakes and fire without damaging buildings' heritage features. The publication of the guidelines has been assisted by a grant from the Lottery Grants Board.

The guidelines, which sell for $15 each or $80 a set, are available through the trust's regional offices.

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