News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Cut Car Travel, Says Scientists

Using our cars less and catching the bus more will improve road safety and reduce environmental damage, say scientists.

Carolyn O'Fallon of Pinnacle Research in Wellington is identifying when and why New Zealanders use their cars and what their attitudes are towards public transport.

“Managing and reducing car use will improve road safety, reduce environmental degradation, provide health benefits and improve energy and resource use,” said Dr O’Fallon.

“We interviewed 600 Auckland and Wellington car drivers who drive to work or study every day. We asked them how they would travel to work if they were faced with higher driving costs such as higher parking charges, vehicle registration surcharge or tolls to enter the central city. “

“We also asked what people will do if the higher driving costs were coupled with improvements to public transport such as more frequent services in peak periods and lower fares.”

“Our findings showed there is a group of hard core drivers who would continue to drive no matter how expensive driving became or how good the public transport service seemed,” said Dr O’Fallon.

The study, an investment of the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology, also investigated the reasons why parents drive their children to school.

“We have been able to gauge parents’ reactions to other safe methods of taking their children to and from school,” said Dr O’Fallon.

“Our work with those parents that drive their children to school revealed a strong interest in walking school buses. This is a system where one parent is in charge of walking groups of children to school and picking children up on the way”

“We are now working with Christchurch City Council to trial walking school bus networks in four different Christchurch schools,” said Dr O’Fallon.

“Ultimately, the success of our research programme will be measured by actual change in travel behaviour. In the mean time, we have successfully provided tools and knowledge to policy makers, planners and transport providers that will assist them in managing the transport network.”

For further information: Carolyn O’Fallon, Pinnacle Research, Mobile 025 240 4196, { HYPERLINK "mailto:pinnacle.research@clear.net.nz" }pinnacle.research@clear.net.nz Madeleine Setchell, Foundation for Research, Science and Technology Tel 04 9177806, Mobile 025 40 60 40, { HYPERLINK "mailto:madelein@frst.govt.nz" }madelein@frst.govt.nz


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

City Of 100 Lovers: Multi-Million Dollar NZ Theatre Production To Launch

Produced in New Zealand, the $8Million budget, musical comedy, City of 100 Lovers, has been created for locals and tourists alike. More>>

Indycars: Dixon Wins Fifth US Championship

The New Zealand motor racing driver Scott Dixon has won the US Indycar championship for the fifth time. Dixon finished second in the final race of the season in Sonoma in California. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: The Outsider Art of Tony Fomison

Among such gifted contemporaries as Bill Hammond, Tony de la Tour, and printmaker Jason Grieg, Fomison distinguished himself as highly idiosyncratic, and could have become wealthy, had not his demons prevented him from investing his income wisely. In his near monochrome oil painting on black hessian, he staked out a territory of morbid originality. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Immortal Love

The series has a wild-west tone with a steampunk vibe, so if you’re a fan of Joss Whedon’s Firefly or Joe Abercrombie’s Shattered Sea, then chances are you’ll enjoy this book. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Trappings of Success - McQueen

This troubling documentary about the extraordinary life and untimely death of British fashion designer Alexander McQueen (1969 - 2010) is a cautionary tale of an extremely gifted, but self-destructive soul caught up in a business that chews up and spits out its creative talent. More>>

Anne Russell: On Nanette, And The Limitations Of Stories

Since many detractors fault Gadsby or other women for talking about their trauma publicly, Gadsby’s most ardent fans mistakenly perceive virtually any criticism of Nanette as misogynist. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland