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Child, Youth And Family Agrees With Pay Report

In a further move to address frontline social work services, Child, Youth and Family and the Public Service Association have agreed to the recommendations of a new report which suggests better pay for the department’s social workers.

The report was a joint initiative by Child, Youth and Family and the PSA, in line with the spirit of co-operation that exists between the department and the PSA. The department and the union undertook to work together on pay as part of the settlement of the Collective Employment Contract in July this year.

“Our social workers operate at the sharpest end of social work but the report shows they’re being paid less than social workers elsewhere,” says human resources general manager Shelley Hood.

“We won’t be able to pay them what the report recommends overnight. But we’ll endeavour to bring them into line with the recommended pay policy as part of a phased implementation as money becomes available, depending on other spending priorities. Increases will be targeted to the areas of greatest need.

“We’re very pleased to have worked with the PSA to analyse these issues and we will continue to work closely with the union on addressing them, including reducing staff turnover which has been highlighted recently.

“The department this week announced a new service delivery network structure to give more professional practice support to frontline social workers. Now the findings of this report give us a clear guide to, over time, improving the financial rewards that social workers get as well.”

Media contact:
Stephen Ward, national media advisor, 04 918 9124 or 029 504 077


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