News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Fellowship Urges More Multi-Systemic Care Solution

Media Release
19 April 2001

Fellowship Urges More Multi-Systemic Care

Solution to Youth Offending No Longer in Doubt

The clinical director of the Richmond Fellowship New Zealand says effective interventions are available for at-risk young people, but some social agencies are failing to make use of them.

Dr Mike Reid says a number of smaller providers are making excellent progress with at-risk young people and their effectiveness is clear to see.

“We hear constantly that the most troubled young people in the community are time bombs and that we don’t have the answers to keep them out of prison,” he says. “In reality, there is plenty of validated evidence to show that intervention is successful when we take a multi-systemic approach. That means addressing the source of the problems in a range of areas – in the family, at school and within the peer group.”

Dr Reid was commenting on concerns from a former prison manager, Cecelia Lashlie, about what to do to prevent young people from becoming prison inmates. “There are some non-governmental agencies who are doing excellent work, often through kaupapa Maori or a whanau-style of support. What we need now is a co-ordinated strategy which recognises that we do have a solution, and for these services to gradually replace the traditional services that focus on containment.

“Providing we can work with the family then we would have a very reasonable chance, through multi-systemic therapy (MST), to prevent a young offender from entering the adult justice system. In the United States, this type of care is achieving a 70-80% success rate after five months. Here in New Zealand we still focus on containing the young person, often for around 18months with no real measure of success.”

Intervention services would have an initial set-up cost, but would be vastly more effective in the long term. One MST team could effectively work with five times as many young people as a residential service, at half the cost.

“The MST model has proven effective in the UK, United States, Norway and Canada. Instead of looking for more solutions and tinkering with what we’ve got, we should be developing and establishing a proven model in the New Zealand context.”

Dr Reid says the Justice Department, Child Youth and Family and Ministry of Health should be commended for supporting services that develop innovative models. “These services are achieving real success. What we need is more of them, and for them to be properly utilised by the referral agencies.” Richmond Fellowship New Zealand is a national provider of services for people with mental, emotional and behavioural disorders.
ends
Further information:
Dr Mike Reid, Clinical Director
Richmond Fellowship, Phone (03) 365 3211

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis Article: A Musical Axis - Brahms, Wagner, Sibelius

Brahms' warm and exquisitely subtle Symphony No. 3 in F major, Wagner's irrepressibly sentimental symphonic poem Siegfried Idyll, and Sibelius' chilling and immensely challenging Violin Concerto in D minor exemplify distinct stages of development in a tangled and convoluted series of skirmishes that came to define subsequent disputes about the nature of post-Romantic orchestral writing well into the following century. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: A Pale Ghost Writer

Reviewed by Ruth Brassington, Richard Flanagan's new novel is about a novelist hastily ghost-writing the biography of a crook about to go to trial. The reader is kept on a cliff-edge, as the narrator tries to get blood out of his stone man. More>>

Negotiations Begin: Equal Conditions For Men & Women In Professional Football

The trade union representing New Zealand's professional footballers has initiated bargaining for an agreement securing equal terms and conditions for men and women. If negotiated, it will be the first agreement of its kind in the world. More>>

ALSO:


New Zealand Wars Commemoration: Witi Ihimaera's Sleeps Standing Moetū

The second of several articles to mark Rā Maumahara, remembering the New Zealand Land Wars. The first was a Q&A with Vincent O’Malley, author of The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800–2000. More>>

ALSO:


Howard Davis Review: Conflict & Resistance - Ria Hall's Rules of Engagement

From the aftermath of war through colonisation to her own personal convictions, Hall's new CD addresses current issues and social problems on multiple levels, confirming her position as a polemical and preeminent voice on the indigenous NZ music scene. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland